The Pri Andrejevih Tourist Farm: Fab Food, Family and Fortifications!

Staying at a tourist farm offers a unique experience in every sense. Each of them are different – some of them are working farms with vast with acres of land, others small, simple but homely. Whatever the size and the facilities on offer, you can be sure of a friendly welcome at family-run tourist farms with copious helpings of home-made and home-produced food.

There are over 800 tourist farms in Slovenia spread through the country, so deciding where to stay can be a minefield.

I’ve visited quite a few in my 10 years of living here and, of those that I’ve visited so far, Pri Andrejevih in the village of Narin, stands out.

The village of Narin is situated midway between Pivka and Ilirska Bistrica and is ideally located for exploring all the area has to offer. In this previous blog, you can read much more about what to do and see in Pivka including the Park of Military History, which is well worth a visit – http://wp.me/p3005k-1w8

The family-run Pri Andrejevih farm comprises a working farm, where organic farming is practiced, simple, well-appointed rooms in the upper part of the house, an outdoor swimming pool, and great Slovene home-cooked food, which is available for guests or, upon prior arrangement, also for day visitors.

Immediately upon arrival, I couldn’t help but notice the imposing church on a hill directly above the farm, and I couldn’t wait to set off to explore it!

The church is located in the small settlement of Šilentabor, which, though there is nothing left today to suggest so, was once the largest fortification complex in Slovenia. You can reach the settlement on an easy path which is part of the Circular Trail of Military History which runs almost past the door of the Pri Andrejevih farm.

From the farm you cross the railway line – observing the stop sign, of course!

Then, just keep following the green signs! Here the path leads up to Šilentabor, or you can continue on the circular path.

You pass the family’s pastures where their horses graze.

Once there the views over the entire Green Karst area are breathtaking, so much so you may need to take a lie down!

From the viewpoint continue past the bear (!) onwards towards the church. Shortly before reaching the church the return route to Narin leads down to the left, but it’s worth making the extra few minutes detour to St. Martin’s church.

It takes about 1.5 hours for the route from Narin to Šilentabor and back, or, for the entire 11.3km circular path allow 3-4 hours.

Of course, by now, hunger had set in and it was time for a delicious dinner, which I had been looking forward to ever since my previous visit to Pri Andrejevih, as they cook and serve the most natural and delicious food – simplicity at its best.

They also produce and sell their own honey, vinegar, juices and fruit liqueurs.

When not out walking and exploring, there’s a chance to relax in the farm’s outdoor swimming pool and to ‘get to know’ the family pets.

Then watch the sun setting from the terrace. A perfect end to a perfect day!

After a good night’s rest and more farm products at breakfast, I set off on another day of exploration of the Green Karst, about which you can read here – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/05/07/sneznik-and-slivnica-witches-and-castles-in-the-karst/

Find more details about the Pri Andrejevih Tourist Farm here – http://www.andrejevi.com/ and about the Green Karst region here – http://zelenikras.si/en/

© Adele in Slovenia

http://www.andrejevi.com/

 

Snežnik and Slivnica – Witches and Castles in the Karst

Last year I cycled around Cerknica Lake (Cerkniško jezero) – the largest intermittent lake in Slovenia and one of the largest in Europe. At that time, however, there was little water remaining and it was more field than lake – such is the nature of an intermittent lake. For up to six months per year this fascinating, mysterious lake is filled with water with a mean depth of over 6 metres; during the remainder of the year the water simply disappears, leaving just green, wildflower-covered fields.

Therefore, following the very heavy recent late-spring rains, I figured that now would be a good time to visit to try and catch sight of the lake in its lake-like glory! One of the best ways to do this, is to get up above it by hiking up Slivnica (1114m), from where there are great views over the vast area below.

My gamble paid off and the lake is currently more ‘lake’ than ‘field’, and you can also clearly make out the village of ‘Island’ (Otok) which becomes, well, an island at times of heavy rain. So, now is a great time to visit the area and also a great time to hike up to the top of Slivnica. The lower part of the path is currently a carpet of wild garlic, whilst the meadows a little higher are awash with blooming wildflowers.

Legend has it that Slivnica is the home of witches and there is even a cave named ‘Witches Cave’ located below the summit.

There are several routes to the top of Slivnica, I opted for the one that begins at Bar Kekec in the centre of Cerknica, from where the path begins to ascend directly up through the forest, taking a little over an hour to reach the Dom na Slivnici hut.

Dom na Slivnici is a popular place to rest, soak up the views, and enjoy a hot drink, a cold beer, and a snack or meal.

A further 5 minutes leads to the actual top of Slivnica, however, unless you desperately want to ‘bag’ the top and/or sign the visitors book, I wouldn’t worry, since there is only an antenna, a wooden bench and no views to speak of.

Throughout the summer, Notranjska Regional Park organises ‘Theme Sundays’ with activities based around the lake and its surroundings, including bird watching, nature walks, horse and cart rides, rides in special wooden ‘drevak’ boats, cycle rides, and more. More information can be found here – http://www.notranjski-park.si/en

Photo: Notranjski park

Whilst in the area I recommend visiting the magnificent 13th century Snežnik Castle – one of the region’s star attractions and somewhere I had, until recently, long had on my list of places to go.

The castle, set in a strategic, remote location on the edge of the Lož valley (Loška dolina), has had a long and convoluted history involving multiple owners throughout its former years of existence, and later, following World War II, it was one of the few castles that remained intact and escaped torching and looting.

The castle’s interior is full of lavishly-furnished rooms crammed with antiques and artefacts that reflect the lifestyles of some of the castle’s former inhabitants. More information about the castle can be found here – http://www.nms.si/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=325&Itemid=56&lang=en Taking photos inside is not permitted, but the exterior is stunning from whichever angle you view it!

Snežnik Castle is also one of the starting points for hiking to Snežnik, Slovenia’s highest non-alpine mountain (1796m). It’s a fairly long hike from here, however, so many people prefer to drive to Sviščaki (1242m) and from there hike the cca. 2 hours to the peak.

At the time of my visit, Snežnik, which you can see below in the distance, was living up to its name – Snežnik stemming from the word ‘sneg’ meaning snow.

You can read more here about my previous visit to Rakov Škocjan with its natural bridges and unique Karst features, as well as Cerknica Lake and the Museum of Lake Cerknica at Jezerski Hram in Dolenje Jezero, which contains an impressive hand-made model of the lake that shows the topography of the area as well as demonstrating how, and where, the lake fills and empties – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2016/07/14/mysterious-lake-cerknica-now-you-see-it-now-you-dont/

You can read more about the above and find information about the many other attractions in Slovenia’s Green Karst here – http://zelenikras.si/en/

© Adele in Slovenia