Discover Tržič and the Three Bells Trail

From time-to-time, when not dashing up and down hills and mountains, and especially at this time of year when many of the paths at higher altitudes are treacherous due to snow and, particularly, ice, I find that an easier, flatter walk such as the Three Bells Trail (in Slovene: Pot treh zvonov) is the perfect choice!

The mainly flat trail leads along quiet traffic-free country lanes and paths and through the Udin boršt woods and offers numerous beautiful viewpoints and places to rest and enjoy the sights and sounds of nature along the way.

Since the trail is circular, you can start anywhere really; I chose to begin in the village of Sebenje where there is an information board about the trail.

The trail is well marked throughout so once you find the first sign showing three green bells, you can just follow them and can’t really go wrong. However, if you want more information and like having a map in hand, then you can pick up a copy of the trail brochure at the Tržič Tourist Information Centre or download the brochure here.

Set off towards the newly renovated ski jump centre in Sebenje (in Slovene: skakalni center).

Then after a short while the tarmac road becomes a gravel path as you enter the Udin boršt woods where you will find the first of 2 trim trails along the way – ideal for a warm-up before heading onward!

After leaving the woods the trail leads in the direction of the village of Senično, from where there are wonderful views of Kriška gora (1471m), with its highest point Tolsti vrh (1715m), and neighbouring Storžič (2132m).

Before reaching the village, the trail turns right, passes a parachuting practice area, then leads to the hamlet of Novake.

Soon you reach one of the three small bells (the first, second or third depending on where you start the trail!).

Shortly after the trail re-enters the woods, where it leads gently uphill, before reaching the next bell and a pleasant rest area.

Shortly before exiting the woods you pass another trim trail – another chance for some extra fitness!

Then, you emerge into the village of Žiganja vas, whose inhabitants came up with the idea for the Three Bells Trail at the time when three bells where being replaced in the village church.

On a clear day, there are far-reaching views from one side of the Julian Alps, all the way to Triglav

…and on the other towards the Karavanke mountains that form a natural border between Slovenia and Austria.

In the centre of Žiganja vas, adjacent to St. Ulrich’s church, stands the giant village linden tree, which is so huge, and in places hollow, you can actually go inside it – and who could resist such an opportunity!

The trail then returns back to Sebenje completing the 9km-long circular route. Much of the route is also suitable for cycling (mountain or trekking bike). You should allow around 2 hours, more if you make frequent stops, and it is a truly pleasant way to while away a sunny winter’s afternoon!

You can find out more about the other walking and hiking trails in the Tržič area here, and, of course, stay tuned to my blog for more ideas and inspiration to come too!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

 

2 thoughts on “Discover Tržič and the Three Bells Trail

  1. Hi Adele,

    Your posts about Triglev national park are amazing. I am thinking of visiting in early April for some mountain hiking. (I have winter axes, boots, crampons and some experience with them in Scotland in winter) Is this possible do you think? Or are the trails closed/unreachable higher up?

    • Hi Paul, nice to hear you have found and enjoyed reading my blog. It’s really difficult to say at the moment what the conditions will be like in early April. For sure at higher altitudes there will be snow, and elsewhere ice, which is more problematic, of course. This year we have had an unusually mild and dry winter – so far at least. Last year, however, we had the most snowfall in March, so there’s still time. Personally I’m hoping that we’ve seen the back of winter, though! In January there were a couple of times when it first rained which turned into snow and also vice versa, which led to a lot of ice, which is still prevalent at around 1,000 metres. For sure you will be able to walk in some places, but I wouldn’t advice heading off on your own without knowing the terrain when the conditions are such as they are currently. If you still to some of the most well hiked trails then, with winter equipment, you will at least be able to hike a few trails for sure. Sorry I can’t be more precise, but winter is, well, winter!

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