A Glamping Fairytale in Tržič!

The growth in the popularity of glamping was already rising exponentially, and this year, due to a certain virus, it has become even more popular than ever, as holidaymakers seek less crowded spots to spend their holidays.

Glamping Mountain Fairytale is a new addition to Tržič’s range of accommodation. It makes the perfect place to escape from the hustle and bustle of the daily grind.

It’s not marked from the main road, so keep your eye out for these signs.

Though only small (6 wooden houses), it fits perfectly with the saying ‘Small is beautiful’, and the area has been thoughtfully laid out according to the principles of Feng Shui.

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Each house is uniquely named and comes with its own hot tub.

Guests can help themselves to produce grown on-site.

In addition to breakfast included in the price, there are also some great freebies for guests.

FREE access to the Gorenjska plaža (The Gorenjska ‘beach’) – Tržič’s swimming pool. It is also possible to arrange a half board stay at Glamping Mountain Fairytale by taking your meals at the Firb’c okn restaurant at Gorenjska plaža.You can read more about the pool and the restaurant in a previous blog post here – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2019/07/03/gorenjska-plaza-and-firbc-okn-fab-fun-and-food-at-the-gorenjska-beach/

And FREE entry to Tržič Museum, which you can read more about in a previous blog post here – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2019/01/02/rediscover-trzic-with-adele-in-slovenia/

Glamping Mountain Fairytale has certainly become a hit in Tržič, so be sure to book well in advance. Click here to find out more about more about what to see and do in the area.

© Adele in Slovenia

Visit Tržič – Escape the Heat and Have an Adventure in the Dovžan Gorge!

Following devastating floods in autumn 2018, when the Tržiška Bistrica river flooded its banks following a heavy storm lasting several hours, during which much of the Dovžan gorge (Dovžanova soteska) was destroyed and the residents of its hamlets were left cut-off, extensive renovation work has now been completed and the gorge is now looking better than ever.

You can begin your visit at the new visitor centre, where you can park and pick up some information about the gorge and surrounding areas. The centre is open at weekends in fine weather from 10am to 6pm; outside of these hours information leaflets are available at the entrance.

From the parking area you can walk back along the road for a couple of hundred metres to reach the start of the trail beside the Tržiška Bistrica river. Follow this easy trail until you reach the start of the most fun, but at the same time also the most challenging, walk through the gorge – Bencetova pot (The Bence Trail).

Below I’ve described Bencetova pot, however, those that want a gentler experience can set off along the road, through the tunnel, then cross the wooden bridge a little further along the road to join the path, thus avoiding the ladders and rungs.

There’s no actual climbing involved, so provided you have good footwear it shouldn’t present too much of a problem for the majority of people, but you do need a head for heights!

First go up…

…and then down the wooden steps.

Next you reach a wooden bridge with an iron handrail…

…and then descend the iron rungs down to the river bed – this is the most hairy part but it’s only short!

Time for a few more iron rungs…

…then the ‘tough’ stuff is over and you can take a breather and chill out by the river!

The path continues through a natural arch…

…then leads towards the hamlet of Na Jamah (translation: At the Caves), known for its quartz conglomerate. It only amounts to a handful of houses, but is about as idyllic as its gets, well in summer anyway!

A little further along the road you reach the hamlet of Dolina, which is home to the Dovžan gorge gallery and the RIS Dolina Exhibition and Education Centre. The centre is open in fine weather from May to September on Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays from 11am – 6pm (11am – 5pm in October).

Return on the road back through Na Jamah then, in order to avoid retracing your steps up and down the iron ladders and rungs, on reaching a wooden bridge cross the bridge to emerge by a small parking area, where there are information boards about the Dovžan gorge in the late Paleozoic era.

Now just just need to continue on the pavement back to the tunnel.

After walking through the tunnel you can cross the swing bridge over the river and return back along the path to the start, or you could instead continue along the road back to the information centre, which is a shorter option, however, there is no pavement on this section.

So, as you can see, a visit to Tržič and the Dovžan gorge should definitely be on your list of places to go – whether you already live in Slovenia and have never been, or for those planning a trip to Slovenia in the near future!

© Adele in Slovenia

The Hidden Treasures of Tržič – Gutenberg Castle

Tržič is one of those places that, on first glance, may not appear to have that many sights of interest. However, there is far more than initially meets the eye, both in terms of natural and cultural attractions. I’ve already blogged about many of them, and here’s another one to add to the list!

Gutenberg Castle (sometimes referred to as AltGutenberg or Gutenberk), or rather the remains of, is one such example. It was first mentioned in 1156, thus making it among the oldest (known) castles in Slovenia. Following an earthquake in 1511, the castle was no longer renovated and it fell into ruin.

The castle is located 663 metres above sea-level above the Tržiška Bistrica area of the town. Though only a couple of walls remain, it is clear to see that it was once a fairly mighty castle.

There are two paths to reach the castle ruins – from an easterly direction (unmarked path, cca. 25mins), or from a westerly direction (marked path, cca. 15 mins) – I chose the latter!

From Tržiška Bistrica follow the road steeply uphill and shortly after passing the last houses and turning a bend, you will see a road that branches off to the right, where there is space for a couple of cars to park.

Set off along the gravel road. After just a few metres you will spot a beehive on the left-hand side; continue along the road until you reach a shrine.

Take the path that leads uphill behind the shrine.

After just a few metres you will see a sign for Mt. Dobrča and the Bistriška planina mountain pasture.

Continue up the steep path for another few minutes until you reach a wooden handrail and steps that lead up to the castle ruins.

The first Ljubljana bishop, Count Žiga Lamberg, was born at the castle in around 1420. Interestingly, it was also Lamberg that in 1465 consecrated the renovated church on the island on Lake Bled.

The views from the castle alone make the trip worthwhile. To the west there is a view of Mt. Dobrča and onwards towards the Julian Alps

…while to the east there is a view of Kriška gora, which is particularly attractive at this time of year when nature is at its greenest.

On returning back to the shrine, I suggest continuing up the road opposite (see below to the right of the red car). On reaching a large villa, take the path to the right which, after just a few metres, leads up to St. George’s (sv. Jurij) church, which in the past belonged to the castle.

You could visit both these attractions as part of a hike to Mt. Dobrča, as a standalone visit, or as part of a trip to see more of Tržič’s attractions. Whenever or however you choose to visit, I hope you enjoy your visit!

© Adele in Slovenia

Hike and Dine on Dobrča!

The ‘green’ and relatively dry winter continues (though as I write, snow is forecast this Wednesday – yikes!), so, even if the weather is slightly cloudy as it was for our hike, you can enjoy a great hike to Dobrča to enjoy the views, the spring (in winter!) flowers, and the great food at the mountain hut!

I was surprised when I first discovered that Dobrča is actually part of the Kamnik-Savinja Alps, not the Karavanke mountains as its position leads one to believe. Dobrča stands in a prominent position between Begunje na Gorenjskem and Tržič and can be reached on marked paths from numerous directions, among them those from Slatna (from the Begunje side), and Brezje pri Tržiču, Hudi Graben, and Srednja vas (from the Tržič side).

We were accompanied by spring flowers most of the way, which, in winter really bring a smile to the face!

Depending on which path you take, it takes around 1.5-2.5 hours to hike up steeply through the forest to reach the Koča na Dobrči mountain hut (1,478m).

However, my advice is not to stop there (yet!) but rather to continue to the top (look for the signs that say ‘Vrh’), which takes around 30 minutes from the hut.

However, at the top itself, 1,634m, the views are fairly obscured, so, don’t stop there either (yet!)… having made it that far you simply must continue another 5 minutes or so to the Šentanski vrh viewpoint…

…where you are richly rewarded (even on a slightly cloudy day!) with views to the east of Tržič and the surrounding settlements, as well as the surrounding peaks of Storžič, Kriška gora, and the longest mountain in Slovenia, Košuta, in the background!

Then, having built up an appetite and as a ‘reward’ for your efforts, head (back) to the mountain hut for some sustenance! There’s plenty on offer including various soups, stews and sausages and, for the sweeth-toothed, štruklji, pancakes and strudel.

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From the hut there are views of the snow-capped Julian Alps to the west, and towards the Ljubljana basin and, on a clear day, beyond, to the east.

This is just one of many great mountain hikes in the Tržič area, many of which I have already blogged about and some that I still have in store for this year!

© Adele in Slovenia

Winter Hiking Above Tržič – Kriška gora and Tolsti vrh

Okay, so I know the title of the blog is ‘Winter Hiking Above Tržič…..’, but, as you will see from the pictures below, the weather – thank goodness! – is anything but wintry right now – and long may it continue I say!

We’ve had almost a month with no rain or snow, brilliant blue skies and sunshine – of course, it can’t last indefinitely, but while it does one has to make the most of it! So yesterday, despite waking up to fog in the valley, we headed out for our first winter hike this year in the Tržič area, this time we chose Kriška gora and Tolsti vrh. In places it looked, and felt, more like autumn!

As regular readers will know, I have a penchant for circular hikes, and this is a great one! You can begin the hike from Tržič itself (cca. 2.5 hours to reach the hut), from Zgornje Vetrno, or, as we did, drive up to the village of Gozd, where we parked in the small parking area on the left-hand side of the road, from where we set off on the steeper of the two paths (shown below as strma pot) that leads to the Koča na Kriški gori mountain hut. Should you wish to do the hike in the opposite direction you can drive further up the road to reach the Zavetišče v Gozdu and then set off from there on foot.

It’s such an amazing feeling when you get up above the fog and see the first glimpse of blue sky followed by the ‘sea’ of fog below!

After about 1hr and 15mins of climbing up steeply – very – through the forest, you reach the Koča na Kriski gori mountain hut (1,471m).

You can take a breather here and soak up the views, and/or head inside for some typical Slovenian mountain food.

Slovenia’s highest mountain, Mt Triglav (2,864m), looks particularly majestic on days like these.

Since there is still snow and ice in many places above around 1,500 metres (and over 3 metres of snow in the high mountains) of course, at this time of year one should always have a pair of crampons with them, which, had we done the hike in the opposite direction, would certainly have been needed in a few places today. The patches of ice and snow served as a reminder that it actually is mid-January!

From here you can either pass the hut then take the path that leads at first in an easterly direction before winding its way down through the forest, or, for a longer walk continue along the ridge for another cca. 1hr 15mins to reach the peak of Tolsti vrh (1,715m).

At the top there is a small fenced area where you can take a breather, soak up the views, and sign the record book. In the background you can see Mt. Storžič, which is on my list of peaks to conquer this year, so, more about that to come in the course of this year!

From Tolsti vrh you can take the path that leads directly downwards – steeply at first before levelling out. It takes around 1hr 30 mins to reach the Zavetišče v Gozdu, which is a kind of (non-mountainous!) mountain hut that is open at weekends.

If you need some sustenance after your hike, you could visit Gostilna Pri Bajdu in Senično near Golnik, which you can read about in a previous blog here, or visit one of the other places to eat in the Tržič area.

So, this was a good start to my hikes and adventures in the Tržič area for 2020. Here’s to many more and, in the meantime, check out the Visit Tržič website to find out more!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

The Tekec Nativity Scene – A Festive ‘Must See’ in Tržič

The festive season is in full swing with the Christmas lights on and markets open in many of Slovenia’s towns and cities.

Even some of the smaller ones, such as Tržič, have joined in the festive spirit and, for the first time, the town had an official switching-on of its Christmas lights recently.

I went along to see the mayor light up the tree, and whilst there took the opportunity to go and see the Tekec nativity scene (Tekčeve jaslice).

There was a large turnout in the atrium of the old town centre, which was just as well so we could huddle together to keep warm!

I then made the short walk from the main atrium towards the town’s main church and to Cerkvena ulica 2 (No. 2 Church Street), which can be identified by a shooting star in the entrance porch – as seen below – to see the Tekec nativity scene!

I have to say that, not really knowing what to expect, I was very pleasantly surprised. The name ‘Tekec’ comes from the name of the house in which it is situated – Pri Tekcu. The fact that it is hidden away in this house in Tržič is – in my opinion – both a marvellous bonus for the town and its people but also a crying shame, as it is such a wonderful scene that it deserves to be far more well known and appreciated.

So, for those of you visiting the area over the Christmas/New Year period, as well as those from Slovenia who haven’t yet been – whether young or old(er)! – I would urge you to go and take a look, as describing it here doesn’t do it justice, though I will give it a (brief) go!

Tržič was formerly known for its shoemaking tradition, and the nativity scene was made by the local shoemaker Jožef Ribnikar (1902 – 1970). He started carving the figures from linden wood using a cobbler’s knife when he was still a youth and began setting up the nativity with scenes from the birth of Jesus in 1935, adding the last figures in 1970.

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The amount of painstaking work that must have gone into making it is apparent in the detail; some of the figures even move. But you need to take your time to look at it and appreciate it, as there is far more than first meets the eye!

Nowadays Marjan Zupan, Jožef Ribnikar’s grandson, has taken over the reigns of maintaining the nativity scene, which is housed in the Ribnikar family gallery, and Marjan delights in proudly telling visitors about its history.

Whilst it is officially open daily from 25 December to 6 January from 9am – 7pm, provided you call or email in advance, visits can be arranged throughout the year by appointment.

Contact details: The Zupan family, Cerkvena ulica 2, 4290 Tržič, T: +386 4 592 31 31 in +386 51 274 374, E: marjan.zupan@gmail.com

You could also perhaps coincide your visit to see the nativity scene with a visit to see a live nativity play in nearby Žiganja vas on 20th/21st December. The event revives old Christmas customs and Father Christmas will be there to delight children too. More information here (only in Slovene) – https://www.visit-trzic.com/prireditve/zive-jaslice.html

So, be sure to make a visit to Tržič part of your festive season and a very Happy Christmas to one and all!

© Adele in Slovenia

Gourmet Fare at Gostilna pri Bajdu and Merriment in Medieval Žiganja vas

Last weekend in Tržič was a busy one, with, among others, a medieval day in the village of Žiganja vas, and Tržič Trail Days – a weekend of guided mountain bike rides. It was a toss up between the two, but I opted to first visit the former – perhaps I have a secret penchant for medieval torture, or perhaps because it meant there was then time to go on to a nearby inn I had heard good things about!

Though only small, the village of Žiganja vas has a number of interesting attractions; the village church, the Three Bells Trail (which I wrote about in a previous blog post here), and the giant village linden tree, which is so huge – and partly hollow – that you can actually go inside it.

The recently renovated St. Ulrich’s church stands in the centre of the village. The first written mention of the church dates back to 1327; its present day appearance dates largely from extensive rebuilding work in 1693, as well as recent renovations to both the exterior and interior.

The medieval day featured plenty for visitors to see and do; guided tours of the renovated church, archery, the chance to dress up in medieval costume, theatrical and musical performances, and more.

It was very well attended and its nice to see such events in small villages; it helps to bring the community closer as well as attracting visitors from further afield. Next year Tržič will be celebrating a special anniversary and many more such events are planned, so, keep your eyes peeled for more!

From Žiganja vas we drove the short distance to the village of Senično and the Gostilna pri Bajdu inn. Since being diagnosed with coeliac disease going to restaurants isn’t the experience it used to be, and in fact can be quite stressful never knowing exactly how a dish has been prepared and if it could have been ‘contaminated’ during preparation. I had been told that they do things “somewhat differently” at Gostilna pri Bajdu, so I decided it was time to boldly go and check it out for myself!

The family-run inn dates back to 1871, as is attested to by the year above the main entrance. It originally served as a stopping point for wagon drivers on long journeys, where their horses could rest for a while and the drivers could get some sustenance. The inn has remained in the hands of the same family since its establishment and throughout the years has become increasingly popular for its excellent home-cooked food, service and hospitality.

It is now being run by the fourth generation of the family, Jani Ribnikar, who, time permitting, is more than happy to take time to talk about the history of the inn and to recommend which of its many dishes to try.

The bar area is reminiscent of an English pub, complete with various humorous pub-like signs too!

And almost every detail in the restaurant has a story behind it, from the pictures and wood carvings to the trophies and other quaint touches.

The huge pork and veal shanks are also a favourite among diners – though do call to order in advance to avoid disappointment!

When Jani said we wouldn’t leave hungry, he wasn’t wrong! We were first treated to pumpkin soup and beef soup.

Followed by two huge platters – one meat-based, the other with vegetables and side dishes made from buckwheat flour, which I can eat, yippee! The  meat-based platter was packed with pork ribs, roast pork and venison – that latter is a popular choice, and at Gostilna pri Bajdu where they serve game with prunes rather than the usual cranberries, thus giving a nod to the tradition of plum-growing in the area.

With so much choice it was hard to know where to start – but we managed…and found room for dessert too!

It’s satisfying to know that not only are you eating a meal made with from scratch and with passion, but also you are eating in a restaurant full of pride and tradition. From the outside Gostilna pri Bajdu is nothing to look at, and it would be easy to pass by the inn without even noticing it, however, now I have discovered it, I shan’t be in any hurry to pass by without stopping, and, if/when you are in the area, recommend that you drop in too! Dober tek!

© Adele in Slovenia

Visit Tržič and Košuta – A Hike Along the Ridge of Slovenia’s Longest Mountain

At 10 kilometres long, the Košuta ridge, part of the Karavanke range situated above Tržič, is Slovenia’s longest mountain.

Its numerous peaks and mountain pastures make it a paradise both for hikers and mountain bikers. And you certainly won’t go hungry whilst on, or beneath, Košuta, as there are several mountain huts and dairy farms on the mountain pastures.

This blog post is day two of the 2-day hike I did on the ridge, with an overnight stay at the Taborniški dom na Šiji (the Šija Scouts’ Hut) – read about the hike up to the hut, the great food and the friendly hosts here. After breakfast, we took one final look back at the hut where we had spent such a pleasant night, then set off to conquer two of the peaks along the ridge.

From the Šija mountain pasture we walked to the Pungrat mountain pasture.

We passed by the dairy farm on the Pungrat mountain pasture (Planšarija planina Pungrat) – no need for sustenance just yet after having only just set off!

From the dairy farm a path leads up towards the Škrbina saddle. As you gain height, the views just get better; first back down towards the mountain pastures below and the mountains in the distance.

Then, on reaching the saddle, the views – in all directions – are magnificent and accompany you all the way along the ridge.

You can choose the path to the east towards Košutnikov turn or to the west towards Kladivo. We chose the latter, not least because my previous attempt to reach the peak didn’t exactly go to plan!

Regular readers might recall a blog I wrote some years back, titled ‘Kindness in the Karavanke‘ about my attempt to reach Kladivo, which, that time, ended up with me in tears and some friendly strangers being very kind! This time, however, I conquered it with relative ease and, in doing so, realised that last time I was literally a few metres from the top before I bottled it, and also discovered that the path down the other side is much easier, so I could have managed it, but that’s hindsight for you!

And the views are, well, you can see for yourself below, but they are even better when you earn them by hiking up and seeing and experiencing them for yourself!

After descending from Kladivo, we carried on along the wonderful ridge walk to Kofce gora and then on to Veliki vrh (literally ‘Big peak’).

Is it a bird, is it a plane…?

From Veliki vrh we descended to the Dom na Kofcah mountain hut which, at the time of writing is in the running for the title of ‘Best Slovenian Mountain Hut 2019‘.

The hut is famous for its excellent štruklji in a myriad of flavours. For me a visit is now a bittersweet experience and (almost) brings tears to my eyes when I see and smell the excellent štruklji as, sadly, there are no gluten-free ones to be had so my once favourite Slovenian food is now off limits for me – a travesty indeed! But for those who are lucky enough to be able to eat ‘normally’, do try the štruklji, I’m sure you won’t be disappointed, and maybe you will spare a thought for me whilst doing so!

This is just one of the many great hiking routes in the Tržič area, where you are spoilt for choice. See the Visit Tržič website, and you can also click on the ‘Visit Tržič’ tab above to see all the other blog posts I have written about what to see and do in the area.

© Adele in Slovenia

 

Hike Tržič: Košutica (Ljubeljska Baba) – 2 Countries, 1 Great Hike!

Despite being here over 12 years, I still get a kick out of being able to cover two countries in one hike, and the hike from Podljubelj in Tržič to Košutica (also known locally as ‘Ljubeljska Baba’) – part of the Karavanke mountain range – is up there among my favourites, not least because it makes a fab circular hike!

There are various ways of reaching the peak of Košutica; I like to begin from the monument next to the road and opposite the Mauthausen concentration camp in the St. Ana valley, which is located on the road from Tržič towards the Ljubelj pass to Austria.

The Hunters’ path (Lovska pot) winds its way up through the forest towards the Korošica mountain pasture. It is sparsely marked but well trodden, so orientation shouldn’t prove too much of a problem, well, unless the valley is shrouded in cloud as it was last Sunday morning!

Shortly before reaching the mountain pasture, the path to the peak of Košutica veers off to the left up to a junction of paths and the border with Austria, from where you turn left to take the path up to the peak of Košutica (1968m), marked here as ‘Baba’.

Although I try to pick perfect sunny days for my hikes – both for my enjoyment and in order to get good pictures for my blog – the weather doesn’t always play ball, and despite waiting around 20 minutes at the top, sheltering from the wind in the vain hope that the cloud might lift revealing the magnificent scenery below, it didn’t – well not at least until we had descended from the peak!

At least I had a flask of tea to warm me up!

The fog didn’t deter this pair, who obviously know where to find food!. They were so tame it was amazing, almost eating out of our hands!

And then, of course, the inevitable happened. As we began to descend the fog lifted, as did our spirits, the wind died down and the sun began to break through.

We could even finally see the cows that we had previously only been able to hear – these ones are Austrian (can you tell?!), since they are on the Austrian side of the border!

The donkeys we met on the way down, however, were most definitely Slovenian!

From the junction of paths, you can either return the same way, walk down to the mountain hut on the Korošica mountain pasture, and/or follow the path adjacent to the fence that forms a border between Slovenia and Austria – we opted for the latter two, i.e. first down to the hut for some sustenance, then back up to the junction and into Austria.

The hut is only open during the grazing season – usually mid-June to mid-September. It offers typical Slovenian mountain food, such as Carniolan sausages, buckwheat with pork crackling, sour milk, and, if you arrive early enough (we clearly didn’t – not that I would have been able to indulge anyway, sadly), freshly-baked strudel and potica.

Feeling fortified, we walked back up to the junction of paths, then followed the path along the border, from where there are wonderful views back towards Košutica – now looking magnificent in the sun!

The path continues along pastures before descending to an iron ladder. I wouldn’t advise this route when it is, or has recently been, wet, as in places it is rather steep, muddy and slippery when wet.

After a while the path eventually descends to reach a forest road (in Austria!), where we turned left and walked slightly uphill for around 5 minutes before reaching the Ljubelj pass – the oldest road pass in Europe – and returned back into Slovenia.

Prior to the building of the Ljubelj tunnel, the steep pass, which reaches 1,369 metres above sea-level, was the main transport route from Slovenia to Klagenfurt in Austria. Since the building of the Karavanke tunnel in 1991, however, the Ljubelj tunnel is far less frequented, while the Ljubelj pass today is a favourite year-round destination for hikers and in winter it turns into a sledger’s paradise!

You can visit the Koča na Ljubelju mountain hut (1369m) for (more) refreshments, if required, before making the cca. 45 min walk back down to the start.

And that rounds off another great hike in the Karavanke mountains in Tržič! Click here to find out more about what you can see and do in the area.

© Adele in Slovenia

 

Taborniški dom na Šiji – Homely Hospitality and Hiking at the Scouts’ Hut on Šija

Unlike the majority of Slovenia’s mountain huts, the Taborniški dom na Šiji mountain hut (translation: the Šija Scouts Hut) is privately run, and the difference is obvious from the moment you arrive.

The hut lies at an altitude of 1,528 metres under the ridge of Slovenia’s longest mountain. There are numerous mountain pastures beneath the Košuta ridge, where cattle graze in summer, and the Šija hut makes a great place to base yourself for a couple of days to hike the pastures or along the ridge. The hut is also ideal for small groups, clubs, school outings, etc.

Owners Simona and Miha pride themselves on the homely atmosphere and home-cooked traditional food. So, I went to check it out for myself and within minutes of arriving, we were chatting like long-lost friends!

And I soon made friends with Jerry the dog too!

The Šija mountain pasture can be reached from several directions; the easiest and most direct of which is from the village of Jelendol, from where you can either set off on foot (cca. 2 hours) or, if you don’t mind getting a dusty car (I do mind, hence I walked!), then you can take the mountain road.

Whether on foot or by car, continue on the mountain road to the sign as seen in the photo below, from where it takes approx. 45 minutes to reach the hut on foot.

The čez frata (translation: through a clearing) path leads up to reach the Ilovica mountain pasture from where its just a 5 minute walk to reach the Taborniški dom.

Note: the path is well marked, however, when you reach the gate at the top of the pasture there isn’t a sign and it’s not immediately obvious whether to turn left or right; turn right and you reach the hut in around 5 minutes.

After a good old chinwag, I was shown to my room for the night. The hut has 4 bedrooms with a total of 34 beds, and a separate 6-bedded room. It has an indoor toilet (always a bonus when staying in the mountains!) and electricity.

I left it to my hosts to choose what to serve for dinner – albeit with strict instructions that it had to be gluten-free. And they didn’t disappoint with jota (a thick cabbage, potato and Carniolan sausage soup) and bržola, a traditional Tržič lamb stew, which these days is getting harder to find, hence Miha and Simona are keen to try to preserve its presence in the Tržič area.

But the best was still to come. The house special dessert – buckwheat omelette with forest fruits – which was seriously scrummy and, even better, is naturally gluten-free too! Well worth the hike! The only problem is I want another one, or two…!

I was fortunate that the weather was glorious, both on the evening that I arrived and the next morning. What a view to wake up to!

And not a bad view for breakfast either!

Speaking of breakfast, you can opt for a more simple continental-style breakfast, or opt to try some traditional specialities such as masunek (a mixture of flour, eggs, salt, butter) and/or buckwheat žganci (buckwheat flour cooked to a porridge-like consistency topped with pork crackling), all served with a mug of kislo mleko (sour milk).

You can visit the Taborniški dom website here (currently in Slovene only, but expect an English version soon), and the Facebook page here.

There are numerous onward hikes from the Šija mountain pasture, either along the mountain pastures or traversing the peaks of Slovenia’s longest mountain. It was sad to bid farewell so soon, but I was equally looking forward to day two of my adventure. Keep reading and following my blog to find out about my ridge hike – more coming soon!

© Adele in Slovenia