The Sky Isn’t the Limit at Lesce Sports Airfield!

The annual open day and model aircraft competition took place at Lesce Sports Airfield on Monday this week – Assumption Day.

We went along to watch some of the amazing model aircraft, which, apart from the size, could easily be mistaken for the real thing!

One can only imagine the hours upon hours of painstaking labour, not to mention patience and precision, that go into making such models.

In addition to the model aircraft show and competition, visitors also had the chance to see aircraft up close…

…and even a chance to sit inside!

I managed to get a shot of a model aeroplane and real aeroplane almost in unison, which perfectly illustrates the likeness of the former to the latter. Can you work out which one is which?!?!

Although the event has now been and gone for this year, you can still visit the airport at anytime to just observe the comings and goings while enjoying a drink and/or meal at the excellent on-site Na Klezn’k restaurant. A great meal with a great view!

You can also treat yourself to a panoramic plane or helicopter flight above Lake Bled, the Karavanke mountains, the Julian Alps and the wider Gorenjska area. For more information send an email to: info@alc-lesce.si

Various other events and competitions are held at the airfield throughout the year, including an annual paragliding competition.

Photo: Skydiving Source

Click here to read more about gliding above the Alps.

In addition, the airport’s location on the Radovljica Plains provides excellent conditions for gliding.

So, another place to add to your ‘must visit’ list whilst in the Radol’ca area!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

 

 

A Different Side of Mt. Dobrča!

Mt. Dobrča can be reached from many directions. I’ve previously blogged about my hike to the Koča na Dobrči mountain hut, so this time I decided to approach it from a different direction, from Tržič, or to be more precise from Brezje pri Tržiču via the Lešanska planina mountain pasture.

This particular trail begins from almost opposite St. Agnes’s church (Slovene: Sveta Neža) in Brezje pri Tržiču, which is located alongside the road that leads from Begunje na Gorenjskem to Tržiška Bistrica.

My trusty companion(s) for this trip were my friend Bernarda and her trusty companion Charlie – the dog. Since she lives in Tržič, Bernarda knows almost every inch of Mt. Dobrča like the back of her hand!

After a short walk up the road, you reach a junction, where either trail leads to the Koča na Dobrči mountain hut. We took the one to the right, as seen below.

You soon reach an old water trough with the sign Razgledna točka, which you can follow for a few minutes to reach a viewpoint.

Return to the main trail and continue on the well-marked path that leads up through the forest before emerging onto a clearing, from where there are great views across the Radovljica Plains towards the Jelovica plateau and further.

Here you can take a seat and soak up the views from the special bench dedicated to the stage and screen actor and author Polde Bibič, best known for his role in the film Cvetje v jeseni (Blossoms in Autumn), and the recipient of numerous awards and accolades.

Continue upwards on the marked path towards Dobrča…

…and you soon get your first glimpse of the Lešanska planina mountain pasture (1,450m).

There is a herdsmens’ hut on the pasture where, in the summer grazing season, you can try sour milk, curd cheese and stews, as well as traditional Slovenian žganci and masovnik.

From the pasture you can continue up to the Koča na Dobrči mountain hut or, for a shorter hike, and if you want to do a circular route – you know how much I love a good circular route! – head back the same way, but only for a few minutes, past the Lešanska planina sign (as shown above) to the bend in the road then follow the road down until you reach a junction.

Here you can either continue down the road to return to the start or take the path to the left towards Tržička Bistrica, as shown on the stone below.

After just a few metres, keep a close eye out for a path to the right that leads into the forest, which you follow straight ahead then diagonally across a pasture.

Keep following the marked path until you emerge onto the road close to a trough with drinking water, which both I and Charlie  took advantage of, particularly as Bernarda tells me that Tržič’s water is among the best in the whole of Slovenia.

So, this rounds off another great hike in the Tržič area. Click here to find out more about this and other hikes in the area.

© Adele in Slovenia

 

 

Be Cool and Keep Cool in Radol’ca!

With the current heatwave here and in much of Europe, no doubt many people’s thoughts are turning to how and where to keep cool. Well, in Slovenia it’s not that difficult really, since the country has so many forests and water sources.

Did you know that Slovenia has more than 60 rivers and streams, 300 artificial and natural lakes and 7,500 freshwater springs?

The confluence of the country’s longest river – the Sava – is in Radol’ca, more specifically in Lancovo, and in the country as a whole, you are never far away from a source of free, clean drinking water.

Photo: SDZV

In the Radol’ca area there are fountains with drinking water in various places, so all you need is a water bottle and you can fill up (free of charge!) along the way, whether on foot or by bike.

There are also several new rest areas, which are situated at road intersections and are the ideal for cyclists to stop for a drink, rest…

…and even a bit of (additional) exercise!

Perhaps you are wondering where to hike in this heat? Well, again, it’s not a problem, you just need to choose the right trails, i.e. ones that lead through the shade of the forest, and also make sure you set out early and have plenty of water with you.

My favourite ‘cool’ hike at this time of year, in fact I went there this morning, is the Shepherds’ Trail, which leads from the Draga valley up to the Preval mountain hut.

You can either return the same way on continue via the ‘čez Roza‘ trail towards the Roblekov dom mountain hut.

Photo: J Gantar

If you want a shorter, easier walk, then the Sava River Trail runs partly through the cool of the forest, as do the Grabnarca Waterside Trail in the Lipnica valley, and the Lamberg Trail in Begunje na Gorenjskem.

If you’d prefer to be in, or on, the water in this heat, then there are plenty of opportunities to do that, too, in the Radol’ca area.

Although currently undergoing a complete renovation, work at the Radovljica swimming pool has temporarily stopped over the summer and the pool is open to visitors, and guests of the Šobec Camp have free access to the natural outdoor pool.

If you’d rather be on the water rather than in it, then rafting, canyoning, kayaking and other river-based activities are available on the Sava river and other nearby watercourses.

I, for one, am not moaning about the heat. Enjoy the heat while you can, I say, since winter is never far around the corner here in Gorenjska!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

Summer on Zelenica and Tržič’s Triangle!

The Ljubelj pass is the oldest road pass in Europe. Prior to the building of the Ljubelj tunnel, the steep pass, which reaches 1,369 metres above sea-level, was the main transport route from Slovenia to Klagenfurt in Austria. Since the building of the Karavanke tunnel in 1991, however, the Ljubelj tunnel is far less frequented, while today Ljubelj and Zelenica are favourite year-round destinations for hikers, skiers and the odd hardcore cyclist here and there!

I’ve already written about winter sports on the Ljubelj Pass and Zelenica, so this time you can read and see the ‘green’ version which, depending on whether or not you are a lover of the ‘white stuff’, is equally if not more beautiful!

After several failed attempts to get together for one reason or another, my friend Sabina and I met in Tržič (I, by bike, her by car) then drove to the parking area in front of the Ljubelj tunnel. Note: parking is now payable, we didn’t realise and nearly missed the sign, fortunately, just before you set off, there is a reminder saying Placaj parkirnino in privarčuj (Pay the parking fee and save yourself a fine) for those like us!

Having paid, we set off…

…up the ski piste.

As is to be expected of a ski piste, it’s a fairly steep incline, but the magnificent surroundings means its easy (or easier!) to forget about the effort.

You soon spot the (now defunct) Vrtaška koča mountain hut, which you pass, as well as some friendly four-legged friends!

You can’t possibly get lost and eventually find yourself at the top of the ski piste and at the Planinski dom na Zelenici mountain hut.

From the hut we could already see our first target for the day, a small peak known locally, for obvious reasons, as Triangel, otherwise called Vrh Ljubeljščiče, at an altitude of 1,704m.

Unlike the other paths on Zelenica, the one up to Triangel isn’t marked, but its easy to follow and you can be standing atop the peak in around 15-20 minutes.

If you want a short hike, you can call it a day and from the peak make your way back to the hut and return the same way or, like us, choose to continue your hike to one of the other surrounding peaks, such as Vrtača, Begunščica or, in our case, Srednji vrh.

The path is well marked with the usual red and white trail markers. It initially leads along a magnificent scenic trail with wild flowers and butterflies galore, then across scree towards Vrtača, where it splits; the upper trail leads towards the peak of Vrtača, while the lower ones is marked towards Stol, which we took.

After a while you come to an intersection of trails, where again you can choose your onward direction.

We turned left at the above sign and went downhill for a few minutes to reach the Šija saddle, where you are again greeted with an array of signs.

From the saddle it’s just a short 20 minute climb up to the top of Srednji vrh. From the top, on a clear day, you can see Lake Bled and across the Radovljica Plains towards the Julian Alps. We, however, didn’t have such luck; when we started out it was a perfect cloudless day but it soon clouded over and the wind got up, hence the views are just ‘great’ instead of ‘stunning’!

After returning to the saddle, we made the short walk down to the Koča pri Izviru Završnice mountain hut, where, again, there you are confronted with numerous choices.

To return to Zelenica, first follow the sign (below) to the Planinski dom na Zelenici mountain hut and ‘Izvir’ (Source of the Završnica stream).

From there its just a short cca. 15 minute walk back to the mountain hut, where you can enjoy some well-earned sustenance (yes, I ‘borrowed’ Sabina’s food for the photo, us coeliacs are used to having our own Scooby snacks with us, just in case!) before heading back down the ski slope and completing a wonderful, almost circular, and highly recommended (by me!) hike.

While in the area you can also visit the Mauthausen concentration camp for some quiet contemplation. You can read more in a previous blog here.

So, that rounds up another lovely day spent in the Tržič area, which should most certainly be on your list of places to visit whilst in Slovenia.

© Adele in Slovenia

What’s New and What to Do This Summer in Radol’ca

It’s hot! Hooray!!! While those that aren’t lovers of the heat are already complaining, I’m in my element at this time of year when I get get out on my bike and in the hills and mountains, and when one doesn’t need to go out dress in multiple layers of clothing!

The tourist season seems to have started much earlier this year here in Radol’ca and elsewhere in Slovenia, no doubt such is the yearning among many for holidays after the long COVID-19 pandemic.

So, with that in mind, this blog contains a rundown of new features and events in Radol’ca this summer, as well as some of the great, existing, traditional events too! As you will see, there’s certainly plenty to choose from and something to suit all the family.

Thursdays in the Square

Thursdays in the Square are back this year with a series of concerts featuring a variety of music. The concerts take place every Thursday evening in July in the old town centre of Radovljica. The first concert will feature Slovenian hit songs performed by young musicians from the surroundings of Radovljica, followed on 14th July by the Argentian-Italian group SuRrealistas. The third Thursday in July Čedahuci will perform followed by Masharik on the last Thursday in the month. Taste Radol’ca street food will be available at all the Thursday evening concerts and, prior to that, visitors will have a chance to purchase arts and crafts from stalls of the ARTish festival.

Guided independent cycling and cycling-culinary tours

Why not set off on a culinary-cycling tour of the Radol’ca area? Guided e-Bike tours are available or just hire a bike (or bring your own), pick up a map from the Radovljica Tourist Information Centre, and set off on your way.

Cycling is an ideal way to get some outdoor exercise, enjoy the fresh air and see and taste the countryside. Along the way you can stop off at the Pr’Šlibar farm, where you can buy fresh strawberries, strawberry jam, juice and cordial as well as dried meats, and the Dolenc Farm where you can taste and buy some of the home-produced dairy products.

You can then cycle on to the lush Draga Valley, home to the Gostišče Draga restaurant. At the entrance to the valley you can stop and take a look at the magnificent ruins of Kamen Castle.

This year Gostišče Draga, which is part of Taste Radol’ca, was once again visited by Slovenia’s top food critics, who awarded it two hearts, thus confirming its place as one of the best in the Radol’ca area. The restaurant with rooms is also the holder of the Green Key in Green Cuisine sign as a result of its efforts to operate sustainably.

The Draga Valley is also home to the parkour archery course, which I can highly recommend.

Free guided tours

Special free guided tours of Radovljica, Kropa, Mošnje, Kamna Gorica and Kamen Castle will be held throughout July and August.

In addition to guided tours, from Mondays to Saturdays throughout July and August, half day Hop On and Discover bus tours, run in cooperation with the neighbouring destinations of Tržič, Jesenice and Bled, offer the opportunity to explore more of Radol’ca and the surroundings. The bus trips are free of charge for holders of a Julian Alps: Radovljica benefits card (see below).

Julian Alps: Radovljica benefits card

Discount cards are available free of charge for those staying in partner accommodation in the Radol’ca area for a minimum of three nights. The card is issued by accommodation providers and can be used to take advantage of numerous discounts and other special offers for activities in Radol’ca and the neighbouring destinations.

Iron Forging Festival

The village of Kropa sits nested into the far eastern edge of the Jelovica plateau and is crammed with interesting architecture and preserved technical heritage, which is showcased during the annual Iron Forging Festival. This year’s festival takes place on Saturday 2nd July.

The festival features demonstrations of hand forging of nails in the vigenjc Vice forge, a small local market, open days at the Iron Forging Museum and the Fovšaritnica Museum House, as well as at the headquarters of the company UKO Kropa, which specialises in all manner of wrought iron furnishings and fittings and is keeping the village’s iron-forging tradition alive.

Avsenik Festival

The hugely popular Avsenik Festival attracts lovers of Slovenian folk music from far and wide. This year’s festival takes place over three days from 26th to 28th August.

In addition to the above, there are also other events, such as the annual Radovljica Early Music Festival, Medieval Day and open-air cinema, as well as plentiful water sports, theme and hiking trails and more! Click here to get the full list of summer events.

As you can see, whether your a culture vulture or an adrenalin junkie, there’s something for everyone this summer in Radol’ca!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

Tržič – A Walk Through the Forest to the Forest!

Why ‘Through the Forest to the Forest’ you might ask? The answer is that this Tržič walk goes ‘through’ the forest to the village of Gozd – the Slovenian word for ‘forest’!

This family-friendly walk to the Zavetišče v Gozdu shelter can be a walk in itself or part of a longer hike to the ever-popular Koča na Kriški gori mountain hut and/or one of the other numerous trails in the same area.

The walk begins in the Pristava area of Tržič, where there is a small parking area almost directly opposite the start point.

The trail to Gozd takes just over an hour and is well marked throughout with signs and the usual red and white circular trail markers.

It is particularly pleasant at this time of year in the summer heat as it runs almost entirely through the shady forest (or as was the case for us yesterday, the forest also provides shelter when it begins to rain!).

After about half an hour you emerge onto the road, where you are greeted on the opposite side by a dazzling array of signs!

Follow the signed trail to the left, which, after around 20 minutes emerges at the forest shelter, where you can enjoy a rest, a drink and some sustenance before either returning the same way or heading onwards and upwards!

PHoto: PD Križe

There’s a small climbing wall and play area for ‘kids’ too! Note: the shelter is usually open on Friday afternoons, Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays, or at other times upon prior arrangement.

Opposite the shelter is a shrine, which appears to be ‘keeping watch’ over the shelter and the hikers that pass by.

If you are looking for a more challenging hike, you are spoilt for choice with hiking trails in the area, the main ones being Kriška gora, Tolsti vrh and Storžic.

If, however, you don’t plan to walk any further, then why not just join in the crowd!

Click here for more information about other hiking trails and mountain huts in the Trzic area.

Enjoy your walk/hike, and, take my advice, make sure you have your waterproofs with you in your rucksack, because at the moment there seems to be a storm every afternoon and you don’t want to get caught out…like we did!

© Adele in Slovenia

All Trails Lead to Talež!

I could probably almost write an entire book about the various paths that lead to Talež – a vantage point on the Jelovica plateau with magnificent views over the Radovljica plains, Bled, the Karavanke mountains and towards the Kamnik-Savinja Alps. However, as I’m writing a blog rather than a book, below I’ve provided a brief overview of just some of the trails that lead up to Talež, so you can pick the one that suits you, depending on where you are starting/staying.

From Radovljica the most direct route leads down from the old town over the bridge above the railway line, down Cesta svobode road to reach the bridge across the Sava river at Lancovo. Cross the bridge then turn immediately right and after just cca. 100 metres take the left fork. Continue for cca. 150 metres to another fork, where you should continue straight ahead (not up to the left).

After passing a few houses on your left, you will enter the forest. Continue to the first green waymarker to Talež, where you should turn left, then at the next waymarker turn right. Thereafter, there aren’t any other visible waymarkers but the path is well trodden, and even if you lose your way, just keep heading in a roughly westerly direction until you reach the forest road, which you then follow, again in a westerly direction, towards the Koča na Taležu (Hunters’ Hut on Talež) mountain hut.

If you are staying at the Šobec campsite, you can cross the bridge over the Sava river from the rear of the camp then continue across the meadows to reach the bridge over the Sava river at Bodešče, from where you can follow the trail up to the Koča na Taležu mountain hut. Note: this trail is somewhat easier to follow and has a couple of waymarkers.

Iz Radovljice na Bled

If you’d like to do a longer, circular walk then you continue onwards from the hut to the highest point of the Talež ridgeTolsti vrh. There are several options, but my preferred one is to continue past the hut following the green signs for Tolsti vrh.

Alternatively, for an even longer, circular walk, you can first walk (or cycle/drive) alongside the Sava river all the way to Selo, where you cross the Sava river.

Then walk up through the forest to the village of Kupljenik, passing a couple of shrines on the way.

On reaching the village you are rewarded with the first of many great views!

From the village, initially follow the marked path to the Babji zob cave before branching off towards Talež.

As this walk is at lower altitudes, it’s also ideal for late-spring (or winter if there’s not much snow). These photos were taken in April, hence you can still see snow on the mountains in the distance.

You might meet a friend or two along the way!

Whichever route you choose, you will eventually end up at the Lovska koča na Taležu hut, where you can enjoy a refreshing drink, a cake and/or something more hearty, while soaking up the views over the Radovljica Plains and the Karavanke mountains (note: out of season the hut is usually only open at weekends, during summer it is open daily).

May be an image of ‎nature, mountain and ‎text that says "‎소충 ሞ0 שעי‎"‎‎

Click to find out more about the numerous theme trails and hiking trails in the Radol’ca area.

Happy hiking!

© Adele in Slovenia

Tržič – A Trip Around Town

It was a public holiday here in Slovenia this Wednesday (Day of Uprising Against Occupation), so we had planned – weather permitting – to do a long hike in the Tržič area. However, it had rained heavily the previous day, and all night too. Although it had stopped by the morning, there were still threatening black clouds and, of course, soaked and muddy paths. So, in the end we waited until the afternoon, by which time the sun had come out, then went to Tržič anyway, albeit for a shorter, but nonetheless pleasant and revealing, afternoon trip, or rather Town in a day!

It’s amazing how much more you see when you take time and explore all the various nooks and crannies of a place on foot. And Tržič certainly one of those places that has far more than initially meets the eye.

We started by taking the path up to St. Joseph’s church. The path starts at the scarp wall, in close proximity to and opposite the main bus station, where there is a gap in the wall and steps leading up to a road.

Cross the road and take the path immediately opposite, where there is a shrine and the usual Slovenian red and white circular trail markers.

From there it’s only around a 5-minute walk uphill to reach the church, from where there are beautiful views over the old town of Tržič.

You can return on the same path or take one of the other paths back down towards the old town (note: there is also a marked hiking trail from the church up to Kriška gora).

On returning towards the old town, take time to ‘meet’ Tržič’s dragon, before setting off on a discovery of the old town itself. Click here to find out about the legend of the dragon from a rooster’s egg.

At the entrance to the old town centre in Trg svobode (Freedom Square) you can see the last remaining original ‘firbec oken‘ window – a window for the inquisitive, or rather, putting it less politely, the nosy! The bottom of the window protrudes outward, thus allowing those looking from the window to be able to look directly out and down at those below them.

If you want a break, Mestna kavarna (town cafe) is the ideal place. This popular local meeting place offers a wide selection of ice-cream and numerous cakes.

Next, continue to the corner house opposite St. Andrew’s church.

Continue past the church, to reach Muzejska ulica (Museum Street) on the left. Tržič Museum is housed in the former Pollak dyehouse and tannery, which dates from 1811.The museum’s numerous collections take you through Tržič’s historic industries including shoemaking, leather, crafts, trade, winter sports, local history, and art. As I found out on a previous visit (https://adeleinslovenia.com/2019/01/02/rediscover-trzic-with-adele-in-slovenia/), the museum is far more interesting than one might think and has numerous interactive exhibits, so it’s definitely worth a visit and an ideal place to go on a rainy day.

After visiting the museum, or at least admiring it from the outside, return to the main road, where directly opposite you will see Picerjia Pod gradom (Pizzeria beneath the castle) – another option for a rest and a bite to eat, or even a hearty meal.

Walk up the hill past the pizzeria to get another great view over the town – this time from the opposite side. From here you have a choice; you can either continue onwards and upwards towards Kamnek for magnificent views (hiking footwear required) or take the steps back down towards the old town, from where you can see Kurnik House (Kurnikova hiša), a preserved, traditional Tržič house with a black smoke kitchen, the birthplace of the Slovenian poet Vojteh Kurnik.

Finally, take time to admire the views from one of the many bridges over the Bistrica stream.

Find out more about this and other walks, attractions and what else to see and do in the Tržič area here or call into the Tourist Information Centre.

© Adele in Slovenia

A Perfect Radol’ca Party!

If you’re looking for the perfect place to hold a celebration or party, or just seeking some posh nosh and a unique experience, look no further than Radovljica!

I had spent quite some time trying to decide where to throw a surprise get-together for Aleš’s (the other half!) 50th birthday, when in the end the choice was staring me in the face – Radovljica!

Thanks to the new Radol’ca Chocolate chocolatier and the excellent Hiša Linhart restaurant and bistro, headed up by the Michelin star-recipient Uroš Štefelin, I managed to put together a perfect evening and everything went to plan, too! The restaurant, in Radovljica’s historic old town centre, is also part of Taste Radol’ca.

I started by sitting down and going through the menu to ensure that all the food would be gluten-free, which isn’t a problem when it comes to this level of food, where flour isn’t used as a thickener, everything is made from scratch and the chef(s) know(s) exactly what is, and isn’t, in the dishes they create.

I took a bit of a detour towards the old town – just a 10-min walk from home – to ensure that Aleš still didn’t have a clue what was in store! I’d arranged it all in advance with the team at Hiša Linhart and bought all the balloons and other decor. On arrival we were whisked upstairs where the others were waiting and then… SURPRISE!!! And I let out a sigh of relief that I’d pulled it off!

We raised a toast with tepka juice made from a traditional Gorenjska variety of pear, one of Hiša Linhart’s specialities. We then sat down to start our feast, which began with a cold starter of warm gluten-free bread with various flavours of butter, a mini salmon and caviar blini-cum-wrap, potato choux pastry, and the most amazing creation in an egg containing pork crackling.

The latter was ‘delivered’ to us by none other than the chef himself – Uroš Štefelin!

I had specifically requested parsnip soup as it’s my favourite, and also because I knew no one else would have ever tasted it, as parsnips are a bit of a novelty here!

We then had a hot starter followed by the main course…

…and then came the next part of the surprise. A visit to the new Radol’ca Chocolate chocolatier, where Iza – the daughter of the owners – took us through a guided tasting session, during which we learnt all about the history of chocolate, the different types of chocolate and how it is made.

First we had a chance to try different kinds of pure chocolate, as well as cocoa butter  – the latter, surprisingly, doesn’t resemble chocolate in any way.

After having learnt a lot about my favourite food, we were then given the chance to try some of the amazing and creatively flavoured chocolates…

….and got some to take home too!

But that wasn’t quite the end of the evening! We went back to Hiša Linhart (all of a 90 second walk away!) where we made sure we really were bursting full by indulging in a gluten-free birthday cake, which I had ordered from Lincer in Lesce, which offers all kinds of gluten-free (as well as egg-free, dairy-free, etc.) food.

So, as you can see, a great time was had by all, and with full stomachs, the birthday boy and I waddled our way home, both in agreement that Radovljica really is the perfect place for a party!

© Adele in Slovenia

The Best Views in Radovljica – You Don’t Need to Go Far!

As the title of this blog elicits, you are never far from a stunning view in Radovljica, and you don’t even need to don your hiking boots or work up a sweat to savour the views either!

There are numerous great vantage points in and around Radovljica, all of which are within a 10-15 minute walk of the old town. Let’s start with the closest and work our way backwards, i.e. away from Linhart Square – the heart of the historic old town centre.

The viewing platform at the end of the old town is a great way to get a ‘feel for the land’. You can see the Sava river, the Jelovica plateau, and the Julian Alps – with Slovenia’s highest mountain, Mt. Triglav.

From the old town walk to the car park that it just a few metres ahead and you will see another viewpoint with a bench and similar views to those from the old town.

Now ahead away from the old town towards the Radovljica swimming pool, which is currently under reconstruction. Behind the pool there is a small hill called Obla gorica. Walk up and along its length, where you can also try out the brand new trim trail. The views are somewhat obscured by trees, but where there is a gap in the trees, there are great views to be had.

There is a second, smaller and lower rise to the east, from where views open up of the Baroque St. Peter’s church in the old town.

The final stop is the small hill called Voljči hrib, from where there are magnificent panoramic views of the Karavanke mountains, the Radovljica Plains, over Radovljica itself, and the Julian Alps in the distance. There’s a bench at the top, too, where you can soak up the views.

By the way, I took these photos a couple of weeks ago (yes, it’s taken me that long to find time to get round to putting this blog together!) and as I write, it’s raining here in Radovljica. However, I can see the snow getting lower and lower, so the mountains are, yet again, snow-capped, and we might even wake up to snow on the ground in the morning, too – boo hoo!

The best and easiest way to navigate Radovljica is to first pay a visit to the Tourist Information Centre, which is located at the entrance to Linhart Square, where you can pick up a map and the staff will be happy to point you in the direction of the viewpoints mentioned in this blog, and, of course, provide any other information you need about the area.

Almost all the COVID-related measures have been dropped now (masks are still mandatory indoors), so this year you really can start planning your trip to Slovenia, which, of course, must include a visit to Radovljica!

© Adele in Slovenia