A Cultural Walk Through Radovljica

Radovljica is undoubtedly best known for its small but beautiful historic old town, which is packed with cultural attractions and is where all the town’s main events take place. However, you might be surprised to learn that there are also some cultural sights elsewhere in the town, which you can see by taking a cultural walk around the town.

A good place to start is at the town library – the new multi-storey red building in Vurnik Square (Vurnikov trg) – which is just a few hundred metres from the main bus station, where in front of the library you can see a model replica of Linhart Square created by the local ceramist Urban Magušar.

From the library take the slip road (with the library to your right head in a westerly direction) to reach the junction with the Gorenjska cesta road and turn left onto the pavement on the left-hand side of the road. After cca. 100 metres you will see the Obrtna Zbornica building (Small Business Chamber) with an iron monument of Radovljica’s coat of arms with a man holding a wheel in one hand and the ‘town’ in the other.

A further 100 metres or so along the road is the Čebelica (Bee) building, which today serves as the town’s municipal administration unit. It was named after the decorative bees above the entrance.

There are also several art nouveau villas along Gorenjska cesta that are the work of the architect Danilo Fürst, a pupil of the well-known Slovenian architect Jože Plečnik. 

Your path will now lead you towards the old town, which you can reach by walking through the town park, past the unique wrought iron street lamps made by blacksmiths from Kropa, and on to see the numerous attractions in Linhart Square, from where you can also take a quick diversion to see the birthhouse of the Radovljica-born architect Ivan Vurnik.

Should you wish to extend your walk and take in a bit more history you could walk up to Obla gorica – the small hill that rises up behind the swimming pool – where you can see bunkers dating from the Rupnik Line – a system of fortifications that were built during the 1930’s by the Kingdom of Yugoslavia as a defence line on the border with the Kingdom of Italy. The strategically placed forts and bunkers were never actually used for military or defence purposes, but they at least brought residents a temporary solution to the unemployment and financial troubles which affected them due to the location of the Rapallo Border. It is said there are around 50 such bunkers located across the Jelovica plateau, Radovljica and Begunje na Gorenjskem.

Click here for full details and a map of the cultural walk.

To end, I’ll give you a brief update about the current coronavirus situation in Slovenia. Following a long (very long!) lockdown that began on 23rd October, finally this week all primary school children were able to return to school, albeit there are school holidays in one half of the country this week and in the other half next week. We are now finally allowed out of our municipalities, and all shops were able to re-open as of this Monday (though all staff have to be tested on a weekly basis). Much as I love Radovljica, after almost 4 months of not being able to leave, it’s certainly nice to have regained a sense of freedom. However, we are far from out of the woods yet; daily infection numbers are still high, though falling, and the vaccination rate seems to be agonisingly slow. All hotels/cafes/restaurants etc. are still closed, though museums and galleries are now open. Tourists are not allowed to cross the border, and only those with a valid reason are allowed to cross the border (with a negative test). So, there is some light at the end of the tunnel, but there’s still some way to get there yet. I’m sure many of you can’t wait to visit, and/or revisit, so hang on in there!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

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