Šubic House – The Creative Centre of the Poljane Valley

Šubic House (Šubičeva hisa) in the Poljane Valley is the creative centre of the valley. Once home to two of Slovenia’s most renowned painters, Janez and Jurij Šubic, today the house operates as a cultural centre with a permanent museum collection, an exhibition space, gallery of caricatures, an information point for visitors to the valley, and an area for enjoying and sharing creativity!

As a young lad, Boris Oblak, formerly the manager and now a guide in Šubic House, used to walk past the house on a daily basis on his way to school and admire its carved wooden doors and wonder why such a magnificent house lay empty. It is for this reason that he now still has to pinch himself when he is the one who has access to that door on a daily basis, and his infectious passion for the house and its content is clear to see from the moment you cross the threshold.

This is no ‘ordinary’ museum, it’s a centre for all. The first thing you see on entering is the imposing memorial plaque dedicated to Janez and Jurij Šubic, which was erected in 1896 in the old Poljane church and later,  following World War 11, was lost during demolition of the church. Fortunately, just a couple of years ago it was re-discovered in one of the houses in the Poljane valley and now stands proudly in its rightful place.

A family tree on the wall helps visitors to better understand the history and importance of the family and their work. In brief: according to records, Pavel Šubic Sr. (1772–1847) was the first Šubic to start with woodcarving, creating works for churches in the Škofja Loka area, and, as was typical for artisan workshops of that time, he passed the ins and outs of the artistic processes to three of his sons, Štefan, Blaž and Janez (Sr.)

Štefan Šubic (1820 ­- 1884) was the most renowned among them, creating paintings, woodcarvings and frescos all around Slovenia. His workshop was the most important Slovenian artisan workshop of the 19th century.

The artistic tradition was passed on to all five of Štefan’s sons – Jurij (1855 – 1890) and Janez Šubic (1850 – 1889) being the most renowned among them. They both studied at academies abroad and, although they died relatively young, they remain among the most important Slovenian painters.

If you would like to find out more about the artists and see their works, the National Gallery of Slovenia in Ljubljana, has permanent exhibitions featuring paintings by Jure Šubic – http://www.ng-slo.si/en/permanent-collection/1870-1900/jurij-subic?tab=collections&authorId=500 and Janez Šubic – http://www.ng-slo.si/en/permanent-collection/1870-1900/janez-subic?tab=collections&authorId=495

Jurij Šubic – A Letter

Janez Šubic – Still Life with Pots

Upstairs in Šubic House, the museum area has been carefully and thoughtfully arranged. I particularly like the original use of the beautifully handwritten letters – over 1,000 of them exist in total – sent between the Šubic family telling of their life, work and relationships. The letters have been imaginatively placed on, and attached to, some of the museum exhibits. Find out more about Šubic House here – http://subicevahisa.com/

There is also an original black kitchen, complete with real smoked sausages hanging from above, and, if you are lucky, you can even try a slice!

Black kitchen in Šubic House – Photo: Klemen Razinger

Black kitchen in Šubic House – Photo: Klemen Razinger

I found it rather sad, and also poignant, to think that in the future, there will be no such lasting memories of people of the present and future generations, since these days, in this age of rapid social media, everything is so fleeting and the days of letter writing are all-but-gone.

Getting hands-on in the museum is encouraged -try wood carving, painting, join in a creative workshop or try your hand at drawing a caricature.

‘Before the Hunt’ by Jurij Šubic – I can’t take the credit for this one!

In addition to running the house, Boris is also an extremely talented artist himself, specialising in caricatures. A few of his works are exhibited in Šubic House but to see more of his amazing creations, see his website here – http://www.karikatureboris.com/en/  His drawings make great original gifts for various celebrations and occasions. Of course, he couldn’t help himself and he quickly got to work on a new caricature …

The result of which was …

One needs a sense of humour! Love the Slovenian flag, too!

From May to the end of October Šubic House is open on Tuesdays-Fridays from 10am-5pm and Saturdays 10am-1pm; winter opening times from November to the end of April are Tuesdays-Friday 10am-4pm and Saturdays 10am-1pm. For groups of 10 people or more, visits outside of these times can be arranged upon prior notice.

I recommend visiting Šubic House as part of a visit to the Poljane valley, where there’s plenty to see and do including the Pustotnik Dairy, walking the Rupnik Line theme path, hiking to Blegoš, a visit to Tavčar Manor or one of the many tourist farms. For more information about the valley see the Visit Škofja Loka website where you can also find links to my blogs on all the above topics – http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/

© Adele in Slovenia

Delightful Dražgoše: The Home of Dražgoše Honey Breads and Serious Sunshine!

The village of Dražgoše is nestled into the southern slopes of the Jelovica plateau, perched at an altitude of 832m above sea-level, above the Selca valley and the town of Železniki. Thanks to its favourable location, Dražgoše is renowned as being one of the sunniest villages around and proudly goes under the slogan ‘Pri nas sonce je doma’ (Here is where the sun is at home).


Dražgoše is most known for 2 things – its intricate hand-crafted honey breads and the Battle of Dražgoše. A good place to start a visit and learn more is at the recently reopened Brunarica Dražgoše snack bar.


In addition to hot and cold drinks and snacks, you can pop upstairs to the small museum for a brief introduction to the history of the village and the tradition of making honey breads.


There are 2 types of honey breads made in the Škofja Loka regionLoka honey breads (which regular readers will recall I recently made at the DUO Centre in Škofja Loka, read more here – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/01/13/loka-honey-breads-and-handicrafts-at-the-duo-arts-crafts-centre/) and Dražgoše honey breads. The key difference between the two is that Loka honey breads are made using a hand-carved mould, whereas Dražgoše honey breads are made entirely by hand.

I visited Breda Tolar and Alenka Lotrič who are masters in the art of making Dražgoše honey breads and are continuing their grandmother’s tradition.


The dough is made using flour, honey, cinnamon and cloves. The honey is warmed through before mixing to allow the dough to be pliable for rolling and shaping.  Some of the designs are highly intricate and labour-intensive – real works of art. Dražgoše honey breads are edible, though in cases such as this one below, it would be such a shame to do so!


Whilst I haven’t been blessed with any form of artistic talent whatsoever, these two ‘pros’ made it look easy. Just look closely at their versions compared to mine!


After the intricate patterns are finished, the breads are baked in the oven then glazed with (more!) honey for a shiny finish. All couples getting married at Loka Castle (read more here – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/01/01/a-spotlight-on-skofja-loka/) receive a honey bread as a wedding gift. You can be sure that it will look better than my finished effort, though its not too bad for a novice I suppose, and I sure had fun making it, which is what counts!

The monument to the Battle of Dražgoše commemorates the World War II battle between Slovenian Partisans and Nazi armed forces, which ended with brutal reprisals by the German forces – executions, looting and torching of buildings – and the destruction of the village. The village was entirely rebuilt after the war. The monument with an ossuary was erected in 1976.



The painting is by the renowned painter Ive Šubic from nearby Hotavlja who participated in the battle as a Partisan, later returning to depict it in art.


Though the old village church was destroyed in the battle, the Škofja Loka Museum Association was able to move the partly-preserved altars to where they stand today in the chapel of Loka Castle, whilst the original church organs are now in the church in Železniki. In the village you can still see the remains of the church which have been well-preserved and where there is a memorial park.


Dražgoše is also an idyllic area for hiking and cycling, albeit, flat it isn’t! In summer I’ve been known to cycle up from home in Radovljica first to Kropa, up to Jamnik and then on to Dražgoše. On this occasion (below), I was feeling particularly energetic and continued down into the Selca valley to Škofja Loka then via Kranj back to Radovljica. It was a long tiring tour but one that I must do again some time!

You can also hike up above the village to the hilltop of Dražgoška gora, visit one of a number of caves (accompanied by a guide), talke a walk along all, or part of, the Spominska pot (the Memorial Path) – a 3-3.5 hour-long route beginning at the Brunarica snack bar.

For more information about any of the above, and/or to arrange a honey bread workshop, contact Visit Škofja Lokahttp://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/

© Adele in Slovenia