Highlights of My Škofja Loka Year 2017

As 2017 draws to a close, so does another chapter in my exploration of another area of Slovenia – Škofja Loka, which I have explored the length and breadth of during the past year. As is customary for many at time of year, it’s a time for reflection on what we have achieved, and time to look forward to the next year and the challenges ahead.

So, here’s a look back at just some of the highlights of my adventures in 2017 exploring Škofja Loka and the Selca and Poljane valleys, which I hope will also serve as inspiration for those of you planning a visit to the area in the future.

I began, as every visitor to Škofja Loka should, with a visit to the old town and a walk up to the beautiful Loka Castle.

I tried my hand at making Loka honey breads at the DUO Arts & Crafts Centre under the watchful guise of the master carver Petra Plestenjak Podlogar – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/01/13/loka-honey-breads-and-handicrafts-at-the-duo-arts-crafts-centre/

One of the main events of the year in Škofja Loka is the Festival of History (Historial), which takes place annually in June – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/06/25/highlights-of-the-skofja-loka-historial-2017/

I had the honour of being shown around the Capuchin monastery by 80-year-old Father Bernard as part of my discovery of the UNESCO-listed Skofja Loka Passion Play – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/04/04/the-unesco-listed-skofja-loka-passion-play/

Photo: Tomaž Sedej

And I thoroughly enjoyed getting active, such as cycling around the town on part of the Loka Cycle Trail with a great guide, Matej Hartman – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/06/11/active-and-historic-loka-the-skofja-loka-cycle-trail/

Then it was time to start exploring further into the area’s two valleys – the Poljane valley (Poljanska dolina) and the Selca valley (Selska dolina).

I had a snowy adventure at the Soriška planina ski resort and explored Sorica – one of Slovenia’s most picturesque mountain villages  – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/02/20/sorica-super-skiing-and-slovenias-most-beautiful-mountain-village/

Showed off my creative side (ahem!) making Dražgoše honey breads in the sunny hilltop village of Dražgoše – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/03/07/delightful-drazgose-the-home-of-drazgose-honey-breads-and-serious-sunshine/

I was won-over by scenic, tranquil Žiri, known for its bobbin lacemaking and shoemaking traditions as well as its unspoilt nature – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/04/17/discovering-the-most-ziri-things/

As well as by Železniki, known for it’s iron-forging and bobbin lacemaking traditions – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/07/09/zelezniki-a-step-back-in-time-and-tradition-lacemaking-days/

And I hiked some of the area’s peaks such as Blegoš – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/07/23/hike-blegos-and-dine-at-pr-andrejon-a-winning-combination/

Explored (some of) the bunkers of the Rupnik Line on my ‘Recce of the Rupnik Line’ – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/08/06/a-recce-of-the-rupnik-line/

Too numerous are the highlights to include them all here, but they are all there on my blog, and will remain so, for those interested in finding out (even) more about the area.

2018 will bring a new chapter in the Adele in Slovenia story, a new destination to be explored in-depth, albeit one I am already very familiar with, but one I can’t wait to get even more familiar with! Watch this space for more details very soon, and I hope you will continue to join my own my journey.

Happy New Year!

© Adele in Slovenia

Festive (and Boozy!) Škofja Loka in the Snow!

Winter arrived this year before winter even began – the official start of winter, that is! For many (myself not included, I hasten to add!), this adds to the festive atmosphere at this time of year, and Škofja Loka, with its quaint medieval old town centre, is no exception.

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Photo: Simon Primožič

On Saturday 2nd December the first of this year’s ‘Loka in the Snow‘ festive events will take place from 9am – 1pm in the old town centre. The event is a combination of the 20th Meeting of VintersSt. Nicholas’ Fair (Miklavžev LUFt), and ‘Windows of Imagination‘ (Izložbe Domišljije), all of which provide a great opportunity to try, and to buy, some unique gifts for friends, loved ones, and, of course, yourself!

Take a walk through the town to see the shop ‘Windows of Imagination’, a group sales exhibition of local arts and crafts.

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There will be around 80 stalls where you will have the chance to meet vintners from around Slovenia and taste their wines, and the sommelier Gašper Čarman will be on hand to provide advice!

To ensure you have something to ‘soak up’ the wine, chefs from the ‘Open Kitchen‘ will be cooking up dishes, and to add to the pleasant atmosphere there will be live music and entertainment.

And don’t miss a visit to, or at least a stroll up to, the imposing Loka Castle.

Rezultat iskanja slik za skofja loka v snegu

Photo: Sašo Kočevar

And, since we are talking about snow, it’s been an early start to the skiing season this year with many of the country’s ski resorts open or about to open, and both of Škofja Loka’s 2 ski resorts will be open soon!

The Stari vrh ski centre, which I visited earlier this year (https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/02/01/sunny-skiing-stunning-views-and-romance-on-stari-vrh/) in located in the middle of the Selca and Poljane valleys, just a ten minute drive from Škofja Loka. Its proximity to Ljubljana makes it a popular destination; in winter for skiing, snowboarding and other winter sports, and in summer for hiking and cycling.

Stari Vrh offers 10kms of slopes (1km difficult, 5kms medium, 4kms easy), together with a snowboard park, night skiing, a toboggan run and a children’s snow playground.

Alas, I’m not, and will never be, a skier, but that doesn’t mean I can’t visit to watch others and enjoy the views!

The Soriska planina ski centre is located on the edge of the Julian Alps and can be reached from several directions; from Škofja Loka via Železniki, from Bohinjska Bistrica; or from Most na Soči via Baška Grapa. You can read more about the ski centre and the nearby village of Sorica, which is well worth a detour, in a previous blog from earlier this year here (https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/02/20/sorica-super-skiing-and-slovenias-most-beautiful-mountain-village/).


Facilities at the Soriška planina ski resort consist of a two-person chairlift, 3 drag lifts, a children’s drag lift, a snow park, a sledging trackcross-country ski trails and a restaurant.

For more information about Škofja Loka’s ski resorts and other winter sports venues, click here for the Visit Škofja Loka website.

Highlights of the other events taking place in Škofja Loka during the festive season include:

  • A Christmas Carol Concert on 14.12 at 7.30pm in the Sokolški dom
  • A(nother) Christmas LUFt market on 22nd December from 5pm-10pm with a visit by Father Christmas and performances by the Ana Mraz international street theatre,
  • A concert by Help! – A Beatles Tribute Band on 29th December at 9pm in the square beneath the castle
  • New Year’s Eve celebrations from 9pm with the group Joške vn in the square beneath the castle and the old town centre

© Adele in Slovenia









The Path to Pustal – Combs, Frogs and the Devil’s Footbridge!

The Puštal area of Škofja Loka is just a stone’s throw from the historic, medieval old town centre and the imposing, hilltop Loka Castle.

Puštal is largely a residential area that has had an interesting history and offers numerous sights of interest. Join me here on a stroll along the Path to Puštal to see some of the highlights and find out more about combs, frogs and the Devil’s footbridge!

The path starts at the far end of Town Square (Mestni trg). From here cross the road to the area of the town known as Karlovec. Continue along Kopališka ulica where, at number 8, you can see Firbar’s House (Firbarjeva hiša), formerly home to Jurij Pokorn, a painter and an ex-mayor of the town. If you look at the left, upper part of the house, you can see the rather unusual ‘rake’ which was used for drying coloured flax linen.

Continuing along the street you can see the birthhouse of Fran Jesenko, a famous botanist and geneticist, and also one of the founders of Triglav National Park.

At the intersection of the streets Kopališka ulica in Fužinska ulica stands a shrine known locally as ‘Lepo znamenje’ (The Beautiful Shrine).

Photo: Marko Plesko

From here it is just a short walk, following the path markers on the ground, to the Devil’s footbridge (Hudičev brv). This footbridge over the Sora river has to be one of the most scenic places in the whole town, and in summer it is an open-air, natural area for a quick refreshing dip!

Legend has it that the footbridge got its name after reputed visitations from the devil. When locals built shrines on both sides of the bridge, they drove the devil away for some time. However, his visitations then began in the middle of the bridge, until they finally managed to drive him away under the Šturm rock by building a shrine in the middle of the footbridge dedicated to St. John Nepomuk – the patron saint of bridges.

Cross the bridge then continue on the right bank of the Sora river towards the 16th century Nace’s House (Nacetova hiša). This preserved townhouse was thoroughly renovated in 1755 and is the only house in Škofja Loka whose appearance has not significantly changed since the mid-18th century and is considered the best-preserved rural building in the Škofja Loka area and the Ljubljana hinterland.

Upon prior arrangement it is possible to view the house and its objects and equipment, which bear witness to the life of many generations and, despite being museum objects, are still usable today. You can read more about this and other historic houses and museums in the Škofja Loka area here – http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/experiences/cultural-sights-of-interest/historic-houses-and-museum-collections

Next you will walk past Puštal Castle (Puštalski grad). The castle was first mentioned in the 13th century but its present-day appearance dates from the 16th century. The Chapel of St. Cross in the castle contains a fresco of ‘The Descent from the Cross’, painted by Guilio Quaglio in 1706, and is considered one of the most valuable works of art in the town. Today the castle houses a music school.

So, where do combs and frogs come into the equation in connection with Puštal? Well, in bygone days, many of the residents of Puštal made their living through non-agricultural activities, of which comb-making was one of the most widespread, and one of the most unusual was by catching and selling frogs, which were in abundance in Puštal at that time. Fascinating stuff, hey!

Another highlight, and a spectacular end to the Path to Puštal, is the hill Hribec and the Church of the Holy Cross. The path leads uphill past the 18th century chapels of the Stations of the Cross. Not only is it a scenic walk up to the church, but the view over Škofja Loka and the castle is really quite special, as I discovered earlier this year when I took a guided cycled around the area as part of my discovery of the Loka Cycle Route – read more here – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/06/11/active-and-historic-loka-the-skofja-loka-cycle-trail/

You can pick up a brochure about the Path to Puštal at the Škofja Loka Tourist Information Centre and/or find more information about this and other theme paths in the area here – http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/experiences/theme-paths

© Adele in Slovenia


Križna Gora above Škofja Loka – Hiking, Cycling, Great Views and Heavenly Food, Too!

Križna Gora is a hill that rises to 681m in close proximity to the centre of Škofja Loka and is a very popular hiking and cycling destination among locals and visitors to the area. It is also home to an excellent restaurantGostilna pri Boštjanu, which I can highly recommend from first-hand experience. Read on to find out more!

At the top of the hill stands the Church of the Holy Cross (Sv. Križ), built around 1500, and the area is also the site of a mass grave and an unmarked grave from World War II. The church contains well-preserved frescoes. At the time of my visit (late October 2017), access was limited as the church is currently undergoing restoration work to repair the roof that has been leaking water for the past few years. Should you wish to see the interior of the church, contact the Škofja Loka Tourist Information Centre.

To reach Križna Gora on foot the path begins opposite the Mercator supermarket in Podlubnik, near Trnje, where there is a parking area. From the car park cross the main road and continue ahead along the fairly narrow tarmac road through the village of Trnje. After a short distance take the right fork that leads slightly downhill where the tarmac ends and becomes a gravel track where there is a red sign showing 1 hour to Križna Gora. The path first crosses a field before reaching a fairly steep path up through the forest.

Hereafter, the path is well marked with the usual Slovenian system of signs – a red circle with a white inner – which are found in various places – on trees, rocks, and, as seen below, even on shrines.

After around 15 minutes of hiking, you emerge from the forest for a great view back over the town of Škofja Loka.

Then ahead in the distance you catch sight of the church and your destination – Križna Gora!

However, people don’t just flock to Križna Gora for recreation and the great views, oh no, they also know where to go for some of the tastiest local Škofja Loka food, and now I do too!

Gostilna pri Boštjanu is part of the project ‘Tastes of the Škofja Loka Countryside’ (Okusi loškega podeželja), the aim of which is to acquaint visitors with traditional foods and dishes from Škofja Loka and the surrounding valleys, and in doing so preserve them for generations to come. The focus is on homemade, local food with an emphasis on tradition and innovation – past and present.

There are wonderful views from the terrace of the restaurant – with something to keep the whole family amused! – whilst inside there are multiple dining areas to choose from including the conservatory for great views and the snug room with wood-burning stove.

On the recommendation of the owner, Boštjan, I plumped for the Tasting Menu which comprises a choice of two 5-course menus of homemade delights. Cold starters are pheasant pate with homemade bread – fresh from the clay oven, or venison carpaccio. For the hot starter I chose buckwheat ravioli with porcini mushrooms.

Garlic or beef soup was followed by roast pork or foal (can’t quite bring myself to eat the latter!), and the dessert – chocolate dream – was a triumph, and certainly something to dream about!

Gostilna pri Boštjanu is also particularly known for it’s St. Martin’s Day feast (Martinovanje). In November every year St. Martin’s Day, when grape juice matures into wine, is celebrated throughout Slovenia – even in non-wine growing areas (any excuse for a celebration!), with, of course, wine, and typical dishes such as roast goose or duck with red cabbage and mlinci (a kind of thin, shredded flatbread). Reservations, especially at weekends, are essential – this place is hugely popular, for good reason, too!

You can find more about Gostilna pri Boštjanu on the Facebook page here – https://www.facebook.com/Gostilna-pri-Boštjanu-138860049611989/ and find out more about Škofja Loka cuisine, traditions, hiking paths and more on the Visit Škofja Loka website here – http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/

© Adele in Slovenia

Zali Log and the Path to Suša: Miraculous Wonders and Water

It might be quite a way to go to reach the village of Zali Log in the Selca valley (though, of course, that’s relative depending on where you live or are coming from!), however, the scenery along the way, the picturesque village and its houses with their prominent blue-grey slate roofs, and the Path to Suša – leading to the Church of Our Lady of Loreto – are among the reasons it is worth making the effort.

The village of Zali Log lies at the foot of Ratitovec, the highest mountain in the Selca valley, and is the last village in the level plain of the valley. The appearance of the village as it is seen today has changed little from when it was established in the 19th century.

Interestingly, the name of the village doesn’t come from the word ‘Zali‘, meaning ‘beautiful‘, but rather from the word ‘Zli‘, meaning ‘ugly’ or ‘bad’. This most likely originates from the position of the village in the narrow upper-part of the valley, surrounded by steep banks and with little cultivable land and sunlight.

Zali Log is also known for its slate roof tiles. In the 18th century, a special hard blue-grey slate was found on the slopes of Bintek (1000 metres above sea-level). The production of tiles for covering roofs from this slate began and replaced straw and shingle roofs, first in Zali Log and later throughout the valley. The tiles from Zali Log slate were of very high quality and were able to withstand the weather conditions for generations.

The Path to Suša theme path begins at the parking area at the entrance to the village. Although there are a couple of other paths that lead to the same destination, I recommend beginning here as there is ample parking and an information board with leaflets and brochures about the path and other sights of interest in the valley.

The path is very well marked throughout – in places with theme path signs, and/or with yellow circles painted on trees, rocks etc.

It only takes around half-an-hour to reach the church and there’s plenty to see along the way!

You can also see one of the many preserved bunkers of the Rupnik line that are dotted around the area – more about which you can read in a previous blog post here – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/08/06/a-recce-of-the-rupnik-line/

The pleasant forest path leads over ‘Galetove lajte’ to the pilgrimage Church of Our Lady of Loreto in Suša, which was built in 1877 and is included in Ema’s Pilgrimage Route. According to tradition, the origins of the church are linked with miraculous events. Throughout the years, a lot of people have sought the help of Our Lady of Loreto in Suša and have had their wishes granted, as is witnessed by the many pictures of thanks that are hung in the church, and today the church is still a popular place for pilgrims and others to visit.

If you peer down over the forest at the back of the church you will see beneath it a chapel with the statue of the Virgin Mary. Within the chapel there is a rock under which a spring rises which, according to local tradition, has healing properties, as has been confirmed in numerous stories.

One such story goes that when a mother brought her blind daughter to the spring, after washing her eyes with the water from the spring, she was able to see. The speciality of the water is that it contains no bacteria, thus it can be stored for several months, or even longer, if stored in a clean air-tight container, and is still as fresh as the day it sprung!

Locals, and people from further afield, regularly come here to get water and to enjoy the peace and energy that is present. A local lady I met whilst there told me about one particular special stone which, apparently, if you stare at it, emits “special energy”. I can’t say I felt any different after staring at it, but who am I to question a theory that has stood the test of time!

Should you feel the need for some extra luck – and let’s face it, who among us doesn’t – you can ring the wishing bell!

 You can download the theme path brochure and find out more on the Visit Škofja Loka website here – http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/experiences/theme-paths/path-to-susa

© Adele in Slovenia

The Path Along the Rapallo Border

The Rapallo Border Theme Path has been designed to acquaint those who walk along all or part of it with the period between the 1st and 2nd World War and the effect the Rapallo border had on the towns and villages along its length. Armed with a copy of a leaflet giving details of the route and its history, I set off to explore!

The theme path begins at Žiri Museum – more about which, as well as the area itself, you can read in one of my blogs from earlier this year – https://adeleinslovenia.com/2017/04/17/discovering-the-most-ziri-things/

There is an information board opposite the museum. With your back to the board, head steeply – and I mean steeply! – uphill to Tabor and continue to follow the usual Slovenian hiking trail markers – a red circle with a white inner.

After just a few minutes you are already rewarded with a fantastic view over the town and valley.

The Rapallo Border was established as a result of the Treaty of Rapallo that was signed on 12th November 1920 in the Italian town of Rapallo. The treaty required a third of the territory of Slovenia to be handed over to Italy.

The effect on those living in the border areas was dramatic with neighbours, relatives and friends overnight becoming citizens of two separate kingdoms – the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later the Kingdom of Yugoslavia), and the Kingdom of Italy.

The entire border was 244km in length and was divided in 70 sections. At the start of each section there was a main boundary stone, with smaller boundary stones in between.

The Rapallo Border Theme Path covers the area of five main boundary stones numbered from 35 – 39.  The path is rather, or very, sparsely marked in places, so do keep your eyes peeled for the red and white circles (on trees, stones, buildings, behind you, in front of you, etc.) as well as the odd yellow theme path sign. Alternatively, you could contact Visit Škofja Loka and arrange to arrange a guide, thus eliminating any such worries, and getting the added benefit of the chance to find out more interesting facts and figures from a local expert.

You could choose to walk its entire length (46km, 9-10 hours), or for a shorter, easier version, take the circular path from Žiri to Mrzli vrh and back, which is 13km and takes approximately 4 hours, with optional extensions to additional boundary stones.

Shortly after leaving Tabor and emerging from the forest you are rewarded with another great view.

If you’ve got kids in tow, or in fact even if not, trying to spot the border stones can be treated as something of a treasure hunt! No. 39 was easy to spot…

..whereas as first I walked straight past no. 38 as it is somewhat concealed by a tree and undergrowth!

If you choose to continue to Mrzli vrh, at the village of Breznica the path descends a little on the road, before continuing upwards, at first on the road then again leading into the forest, towards the peak of Mrzli vrh and the Koča na Mrzlem vrhu mountain hut. The hut is open on Friday, Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays.

From here you could opt to return by the same route, or alternatively take the circular route via Ledenica to return to Žiri; the latter, however, means quite a few kilometres, though a pleasant walk, back through the valley to return to the museum.

The views that accompany you along the ridge of Mrzli vrh aren’t half bad either!

There is also an alternative start for the route which begins in Sovodenj and leads to Mrzli vrh (14km, cca.4 hours – one way), or you could walk a shorter circular route from Sovodenj to Nova Oselica and back (6km, cca. 2 hours).

For more information, see the Visit Škofja Loka website or visit the Škofja Loka Tourist Information Centre to pick up a leaflet – http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/experiences/theme-paths/rappalo-border

© Adele in Slovenia

Šubic House – The Creative Centre of the Poljane Valley

Šubic House (Šubičeva hisa) in the Poljane Valley is the creative centre of the valley. Once home to two of Slovenia’s most renowned painters, Janez and Jurij Šubic, today the house operates as a cultural centre with a permanent museum collection, an exhibition space, gallery of caricatures, an information point for visitors to the valley, and an area for enjoying and sharing creativity!

As a young lad, Boris Oblak, formerly the manager and now a guide in Šubic House, used to walk past the house on a daily basis on his way to school and admire its carved wooden doors and wonder why such a magnificent house lay empty. It is for this reason that he now still has to pinch himself when he is the one who has access to that door on a daily basis, and his infectious passion for the house and its content is clear to see from the moment you cross the threshold.

This is no ‘ordinary’ museum, it’s a centre for all. The first thing you see on entering is the imposing memorial plaque dedicated to Janez and Jurij Šubic, which was erected in 1896 in the old Poljane church and later,  following World War 11, was lost during demolition of the church. Fortunately, just a couple of years ago it was re-discovered in one of the houses in the Poljane valley and now stands proudly in its rightful place.

A family tree on the wall helps visitors to better understand the history and importance of the family and their work. In brief: according to records, Pavel Šubic Sr. (1772–1847) was the first Šubic to start with woodcarving, creating works for churches in the Škofja Loka area, and, as was typical for artisan workshops of that time, he passed the ins and outs of the artistic processes to three of his sons, Štefan, Blaž and Janez (Sr.)

Štefan Šubic (1820 ­- 1884) was the most renowned among them, creating paintings, woodcarvings and frescos all around Slovenia. His workshop was the most important Slovenian artisan workshop of the 19th century.

The artistic tradition was passed on to all five of Štefan’s sons – Jurij (1855 – 1890) and Janez Šubic (1850 – 1889) being the most renowned among them. They both studied at academies abroad and, although they died relatively young, they remain among the most important Slovenian painters.

If you would like to find out more about the artists and see their works, the National Gallery of Slovenia in Ljubljana, has permanent exhibitions featuring paintings by Jure Šubic – http://www.ng-slo.si/en/permanent-collection/1870-1900/jurij-subic?tab=collections&authorId=500 and Janez Šubic – http://www.ng-slo.si/en/permanent-collection/1870-1900/janez-subic?tab=collections&authorId=495

Jurij Šubic – A Letter

Janez Šubic – Still Life with Pots

Upstairs in Šubic House, the museum area has been carefully and thoughtfully arranged. I particularly like the original use of the beautifully handwritten letters – over 1,000 of them exist in total – sent between the Šubic family telling of their life, work and relationships. The letters have been imaginatively placed on, and attached to, some of the museum exhibits. Find out more about Šubic House here – http://subicevahisa.com/

There is also an original black kitchen, complete with real smoked sausages hanging from above, and, if you are lucky, you can even try a slice!

Black kitchen in Šubic House – Photo: Klemen Razinger

Black kitchen in Šubic House – Photo: Klemen Razinger

I found it rather sad, and also poignant, to think that in the future, there will be no such lasting memories of people of the present and future generations, since these days, in this age of rapid social media, everything is so fleeting and the days of letter writing are all-but-gone.

Getting hands-on in the museum is encouraged -try wood carving, painting, join in a creative workshop or try your hand at drawing a caricature.

‘Before the Hunt’ by Jurij Šubic – I can’t take the credit for this one!

In addition to running the house, Boris is also an extremely talented artist himself, specialising in caricatures. A few of his works are exhibited in Šubic House but to see more of his amazing creations, see his website here – http://www.karikatureboris.com/en/  His drawings make great original gifts for various celebrations and occasions. Of course, he couldn’t help himself and he quickly got to work on a new caricature …

The result of which was …

One needs a sense of humour! Love the Slovenian flag, too!

From May to the end of October Šubic House is open on Tuesdays-Fridays from 10am-5pm and Saturdays 10am-1pm; winter opening times from November to the end of April are Tuesdays-Friday 10am-4pm and Saturdays 10am-1pm. For groups of 10 people or more, visits outside of these times can be arranged upon prior notice.

I recommend visiting Šubic House as part of a visit to the Poljane valley, where there’s plenty to see and do including the Pustotnik Dairy, walking the Rupnik Line theme path, hiking to Blegoš, a visit to Tavčar Manor or one of the many tourist farms. For more information about the valley see the Visit Škofja Loka website where you can also find links to my blogs on all the above topics – http://www.visitskofjaloka.si/en/

© Adele in Slovenia