Ten Top Insider Radol’ca Tips!

Since I think I have a right these days to call myself a ‘Radolčanka’ (i.e. a Radovljica local), I thought I would share with you some of my top insider tips, some of which are more obvious than others!

So, in no particular order…

YOU WILL NEVER GO HUNGRY OR THIRSTY IN RADOVLJICA…at the last count – in my head that is so I could have forgotten the odd one – I totted up 23 bars, cafes and restaurants in Radovljica itself – not to mention the numerous others within the municipality. So, there’s no need to worry about going hungry or thirsty whilst visiting! And now there’s an exciting new ‘kid’ in town too – Linhart Hotel & Bistro – in Linhart Square, the heart of the old town. The hotel opened a couple of years ago but has just been taken over by the hugely successful and popular restaurant Vila Podvin, with head chef (and celebrity chef these days!) Uroš Štefelin at the helm. Expect bistro-style food – Uroš style!

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THERE’S A VISIBLE TUNNEL... Okay, so it’s not an insider tip as such, but I’ve included it here since it’s easy to miss. The only preserved moat tunnel in Slovenia is found beneath Radovljica’s old town centre. It was renovated, and partly built-over, some years back, and is well-illuminated, meaning you can walk through it at any time as part of a visit to the old town centre. I’m rather lucky as I live just minutes from the old town and can therefore see it by day and by night, though the latter trumps it for me!

Radoljice1HDR

AND AN INVISIBLE/HIDDEN TUNNEL TOO…well, that is if legend is true! It is said that there is a tunnel that runs underground from the well in Linhart Square all the way to Lipnica Castle. To date no one has actually found it, but the legend lives on…!

AND EVEN A ‘SECRET’ CHAPEL…the Edith Stein Chapel is hidden away behind the vestry tower of Radovljica’s baroque St. Peter’s church in Linhart Square, and surprisingly few people even know it’s there. Edith Stein was a German-Jewish philosopher, born on 12 October 1891 to Jewish parents, who converted to Catholicism and became a Carmelite nun.

Also know as St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, she was canonised as a martyr and saint of the Catholic Church, and is one of six co-patron saints of Europe. Edith and her sister Rosa, who was also a convert and an extern sister, were sent to the Carmelite monastery in Echt in the Netherlands in 1938 for their safety, where, despite the Nazi invasion in 1940, they remained until they were arrested by the Nazis on 2 August 1942 and sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp, where they died in the gas chamber on 9 August 1942.

WE HAVE RATHER LOVELY CEMETRIES…bear with me on this one! I know it might sound odd but it’s true, Radovljica’s (and in fact in general throughout the country) two cemetries are so well kept. There is always an abundance of fresh flowers, plants and glowing candles, and a sense of peace prevails. You can admire both the cemetries as you pass on a walk towards the Sava river and the Fux footbridge.

RADOVLJICA REALLY IS A ‘SWEET’ TOWN…in so many ways! Not only is the town’s slogan ‘Honestly Sweet‘ but Radovljica is also the home of the biggest and best chocolate festival in Slovenia and a honey festival too. This year’s Radovljica Chocolate Festival – the 9th in a row – takes place from Friday 17th to Sunday 19th April.

WE LIKE TO STICK TOGETHERTaste Radol’ca is a great example of this. Rather than being in competition with each other, many of Radol’ca’s restaurants have joined forces and, in doing so, have realised and reaped the benefits of cooperation and collaboration. In doing so they are also supporting local farmers, beekeepers and producers of other goods, by including locally sourced ingredients on their menus. Each year there are an increasing number of events at which Taste Radol’ca restaurants are present, such as the Radovljica Chocolate Festival, summer Thursday concert evenings, the November Month of Local Cuisine, various Christmas and New Year events, and more.

WE LOVE OUR BEES…the Museum of Apiculture, the Beekeeping Education Centre of Gorenjska, the ‘Follow a Bee Through Radovljica‘ family adventure, an annual Honey Festival, and numerous beautifully painted apiaries where hardworking bees, and equally hardworking beekeepers, ensure that we have a plentiful supply of local honey.

IT LOOKS GREAT FROM ABOVE OR BELOW…Wherever you view Radovljica from – whether up high in the mountains or down beneaths its terraces – Radovljica’s old town centre with its prominent church is picture postcard stuff! So, whether you choose a stroll beside the Sava river on the Sava River Trail, or one of the marked hiking trails, such as to St. Peter’s church above Begunje, or even higher to the Roblek mountain hut or the peak of Begunščica, you are assured of a great view and a totally different perspective of the beauty of Radovljica and its surroundings.

SEEK OUT BUNKERS FROM THE RUPNIK LINE…the Rupnik Line is a system of fortifications that were built during the 1930’s by the Kingdom of Yugoslavia as a defence line on the border with the Kingdom of Italy. The strategically placed forts and bunkers were never actually used for military or defence purposes, but they at least brought residents a temporary solution to the unemployment and financial troubles which affected them due to the location of the Rapallo Border. In Radovljica there are bunkers on the Obla gorica hill, which is located behind the swimming pool, as well as on the grassy bank in the street Cankarjeva ulicacop. I recently read that, in fact, there are around 50 such bunkers located across the Jelovica plateau, Radovljica and Begunje na Gorenjskem, though, to date at least, I’ve only come across a handful. Hmm, an idea is brewing, how many (more) can I/you find?!

I hope this has given you plenty of ideas for exploring (more of) Radovljica and you’ll agree that’s there’s certainly more than meets the eye!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

Winter Hiking Above Tržič – Kriška gora and Tolsti vrh

Okay, so I know the title of the blog is ‘Winter Hiking Above Tržič…..’, but, as you will see from the pictures below, the weather – thank goodness! – is anything but wintry right now – and long may it continue I say!

We’ve had almost a month with no rain or snow, brilliant blue skies and sunshine – of course, it can’t last indefinitely, but while it does one has to make the most of it! So yesterday, despite waking up to fog in the valley, we headed out for our first winter hike this year in the Tržič area, this time we chose Kriška gora and Tolsti vrh. In places it looked, and felt, more like autumn!

As regular readers will know, I have a penchant for circular hikes, and this is a great one! You can begin the hike from Tržič itself (cca. 2.5 hours to reach the hut), from Zgornje Vetrno, or, as we did, drive up to the village of Gozd, where we parked in the small parking area on the left-hand side of the road, from where we set off on the steeper of the two paths (shown below as strma pot) that leads to the Koča na Kriški gori mountain hut. Should you wish to do the hike in the opposite direction you can drive further up the road to reach the Zavetišče v Gozdu and then set off from there on foot.

It’s such an amazing feeling when you get up above the fog and see the first glimpse of blue sky followed by the ‘sea’ of fog below!

After about 1hr and 15mins of climbing up steeply – very – through the forest, you reach the Koča na Kriski gori mountain hut (1,471m).

You can take a breather here and soak up the views, and/or head inside for some typical Slovenian mountain food.

Slovenia’s highest mountain, Mt Triglav (2,864m), looks particularly majestic on days like these.

Since there is still snow and ice in many places above around 1,500 metres (and over 3 metres of snow in the high mountains) of course, at this time of year one should always have a pair of crampons with them, which, had we done the hike in the opposite direction, would certainly have been needed in a few places today. The patches of ice and snow served as a reminder that it actually is mid-January!

From here you can either pass the hut then take the path that leads at first in an easterly direction before winding its way down through the forest, or, for a longer walk continue along the ridge for another cca. 1hr 15mins to reach the peak of Tolsti vrh (1,715m).

At the top there is a small fenced area where you can take a breather, soak up the views, and sign the record book. In the background you can see Mt. Storžič, which is on my list of peaks to conquer this year, so, more about that to come in the course of this year!

From Tolsti vrh you can take the path that leads directly downwards – steeply at first before levelling out. It takes around 1hr 30 mins to reach the Zavetišče v Gozdu, which is a kind of (non-mountainous!) mountain hut that is open at weekends.

If you need some sustenance after your hike, you could visit Gostilna Pri Bajdu in Senično near Golnik, which you can read about in a previous blog here, or visit one of the other places to eat in the Tržič area.

So, this was a good start to my hikes and adventures in the Tržič area for 2020. Here’s to many more and, in the meantime, check out the Visit Tržič website to find out more!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

The Magnificent Radovljica Manor – (even) More Than Meets the Eye!

The magnificent and imposing Radovljica Manor dominates Linhart Square – the heart of Radovljica’s historic old town.

The building houses numerous attractions and institutions, among them the Radovljica Music School, the Museum of Apiculture, the Municipal Museum, two small gallery areas, and the wonderful Baroque Hall.

Photo: Tourism Radol’ca

The Orthenburgs built a small castle in the 13th century on the site on today’s manor. The structure was rebuilt following an earthquake in 1511 by the building’s then-tenant Count Dietrichstein, and in the following century it was further expanded by the Counts of Thurn-Valsassina.

Immediately on entering the manor through the impressive, not to mention heavy, door you spot the beautiful grand central staircase, made out of green tuff, which hints at the grandeur of the building.

Before reaching the staircase you will notice a photographic exhibition on the right-side of the entrance hall. The exhibition changes every month so it’s always worth popping in for a look when passing!

Much of the space on the ground floor is today given over to the Radovljica Music School. But if you have a nose around, you will discover other hidden features, such as this sundial, which I discovered for the first time today, despite having lived here for almost 13 years!

Photo: Adele in Slovenia

Head up the magnificent stairs to visit the Museum of Apiculture and the adjoining Municipal Museum, while numerous concerts take place throughout the year in the Baroque Hall with its amazing acoustics.

The Museum of Apiculture is a hive of activity for beekeepers and bee enthusiasts! It houses a wide collection of bee hives and figural hives, beekeeping equipment and tools.

The museum’s extensive collection of painted beehive frontal panels, including the oldest known in the world, is a particular highlight. Each one tells its own unique folk tale.

The manor also plays host to some of Radovljica’s larger annual events, among them the Radovljica Chocolate Festival, which takes place both indoors and outdoors at various venues throughout the town, as well as the Radovljica Festival – a festival of early music.

A chocolate-themed fashion show in the Radovljica Manor!

Photo: Miha Horvat, 2014

The Radovljica Manor also makes a special venue for weddings and other ceremonies/celebrations.

Photo: Tourism Radol’ca

Photo: Tourism Radol’ca

Outside, to the right of the manor, there is a statue of the art historian and honorary citizen of Radovljica Cene Avguštin, and also a small exhibition titled ‘Radovljica, Our Old Town Through the Centuries’.

So, when visiting Radovljica, be sure to take time to discover the manor – both inside and out. And to end, one useful tip…there are toilets on the ground floor. Not an attraction in themselves but always good to know, wouldn’t you agree?!

© Adele in Slovenia

The Tekec Nativity Scene – A Festive ‘Must See’ in Tržič

The festive season is in full swing with the Christmas lights on and markets open in many of Slovenia’s towns and cities.

Even some of the smaller ones, such as Tržič, have joined in the festive spirit and, for the first time, the town had an official switching-on of its Christmas lights recently.

I went along to see the mayor light up the tree, and whilst there took the opportunity to go and see the Tekec nativity scene (Tekčeve jaslice).

There was a large turnout in the atrium of the old town centre, which was just as well so we could huddle together to keep warm!

I then made the short walk from the main atrium towards the town’s main church and to Cerkvena ulica 2 (No. 2 Church Street), which can be identified by a shooting star in the entrance porch – as seen below – to see the Tekec nativity scene!

I have to say that, not really knowing what to expect, I was very pleasantly surprised. The name ‘Tekec’ comes from the name of the house in which it is situated – Pri Tekcu. The fact that it is hidden away in this house in Tržič is – in my opinion – both a marvellous bonus for the town and its people but also a crying shame, as it is such a wonderful scene that it deserves to be far more well known and appreciated.

So, for those of you visiting the area over the Christmas/New Year period, as well as those from Slovenia who haven’t yet been – whether young or old(er)! – I would urge you to go and take a look, as describing it here doesn’t do it justice, though I will give it a (brief) go!

Tržič was formerly known for its shoemaking tradition, and the nativity scene was made by the local shoemaker Jožef Ribnikar (1902 – 1970). He started carving the figures from linden wood using a cobbler’s knife when he was still a youth and began setting up the nativity with scenes from the birth of Jesus in 1935, adding the last figures in 1970.

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The amount of painstaking work that must have gone into making it is apparent in the detail; some of the figures even move. But you need to take your time to look at it and appreciate it, as there is far more than first meets the eye!

Nowadays Marjan Zupan, Jožef Ribnikar’s grandson, has taken over the reigns of maintaining the nativity scene, which is housed in the Ribnikar family gallery, and Marjan delights in proudly telling visitors about its history.

Whilst it is officially open daily from 25 December to 6 January from 9am – 7pm, provided you call or email in advance, visits can be arranged throughout the year by appointment.

Contact details: The Zupan family, Cerkvena ulica 2, 4290 Tržič, T: +386 4 592 31 31 in +386 51 274 374, E: marjan.zupan@gmail.com

You could also perhaps coincide your visit to see the nativity scene with a visit to see a live nativity play in nearby Žiganja vas on 20th/21st December. The event revives old Christmas customs and Father Christmas will be there to delight children too. More information here (only in Slovene) – https://www.visit-trzic.com/prireditve/zive-jaslice.html

So, be sure to make a visit to Tržič part of your festive season and a very Happy Christmas to one and all!

© Adele in Slovenia

Let the Festive Season Begin in Radovljica!

It’s that time of year again in RadovljicaFestive December time!

Time to switch on the Christmas lights; time to browse the stalls at the mini Christmas market; time to warm your cockles with a mulled wine or two; and time to soak up the atmosphere and marvel at the decorations in Radovljica’s old town centre – which is especially fairytale-like during the festive season. To whet your appetite check out the ‘December in Radovljica‘ video below!

The festive season officially kicked off earlier today with the switching on of the Christmas lights and the closing event of this year’s Taste Radol’ca Month of Local Cuisine. I’ve just returned home and my fingers have just about defrosted enough to download the photos of the entertainment!

I don’t think I’ve ever seen Linhart Square so full! But whether its full or empty, it’s always magical – even more so in December, of course!

The festive fun then resumes on Saturday 21st December through until New Year’s Eve with a variety of events, concerts, workshops and performances – the highlights of which are below.

On Saturday 21st December there will be a (small) Christmas market from 12noon-8pm, fairytale horses for children from 12noon-3pm, a Kropa nailmaking workshop, and from 5-8pm Taste Radol’ca restaurants will once again be cooking up great street food, which you can enjoy whilst listening to a concert by ‘Fed Horses, which kicks off at 6pm.

On Sunday 22nd December Radovljica will host, for the first time, the Artish Festival – a creative festival usually held in Ljubljana – while on the same day there will be two creative workshops as well as concert by Natasa Artiček.

The Christmas market will be open on Monday 23rd December from 3–7pm, whilst at 5pm there will be a performance by pupils and ballet dancers of the Radovljica Music School and children’s folklore groups, and from 6–7pm a workshop for children titled: ‘Radol’ca – A Golden Crown’.

On Christmas Day itself, why not take a stroll through the old town centre to work off your lunch where at 5pm you can watch a street show by Ana Snežna.

On Thursday 26th December at 4pm you can watch a dance performance by Moj klub in the Baroque Hall of the Radovljica Manor followed by at 5pm in Linhart Square a fire show by Čupakabra, titled ‘School for Dragons‘.

On Friday 27th December those with kids won’t want to miss a puppet show at 5pm titled ‘The Wrong Day’ and a visit by Grandfather Frost.

On Saturday 28th December, in addition to the Christmas market, you can once again try some great Taste Radol’ca street food from 5-8pm, while children can join in a face painting workshop from 5-7pm and then from 6-8pm there will be a concert by Andrej Šifrer.

On Sunday 29th December there’s another chance to watch a(nother) street show performance by Ana Snežna at 5pm followed by carol singing through Linhart Square starting at 6pm.

So, as you can see, there’s more than enough reasons to visit Radovljica during the festive season. Hope to see you there – or rather I should say “here”!

© Adele in Slovenia

Taste the Treasures of the Forest with Taste Radol’ca 2019!

Yes, it’s that time of the year again, the tastiest time of the year in Radol’ca – the Taste Radol’ca Month of Local Cuisine!

Photo: Boris Pretnar, Source: http://www.radolca.si

As in the past, for the whole month of November you can visit any (or all!) of the nine participating Taste Radol’ca restaurants to try their special menus created using ingredients sourced and grown locally by local suppliers in the Radol’ca area.

The theme of the menus this year, of course in addition to local ingredients, is the forest, which offers an abundance of ingredients, some of them rather unusual. The talented Taste Radol’ca chefs have been hard at work coming up with new flavour combinations using the wealth of ingredients readily available in the forest during autumn. You can try dishes such as rosehip soup, fillet of white fish with spruce tip salt, venison occo bucco with juniper berry sauce, forest honey and spruce tip ice-cream…

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Every year the opening Taste Radol’ca event is held at one of the participating restaurants, and this year it was the turn of Gostišče Draga in the Draga valley in Begunje na Gorenjskem to host the event. It began with a market featuring local and guest suppliers and the chance to try their products…

…as well as the chance to meet the chefs and taste some of their creations.

And of course there was plenty of entertainment too!

The evening continued (or rather is continuing as I write!) late into the night with the opening dinner where diners were treated to a five-course feast.

Photo: Boris Pretnar, Source: http://www.radolca.si

Photo: Boris Pretnar, Source: http://www.radolca.si

There are two changes to the line-up of restaurants this year, with Jostov hram and Restavracija Lambergh exiting the fold, while Restavracija Center and Restavracija Tabor have joined the happy Taste Radol’ca family!

The other significant addition this year is supplier open days. On Fridays, Saturday and Sundays during the month of November you can visit some of the suppliers in the Radol’ca area where you will have an opportunity to meet the producers and taste their products.

Local Taste Radol’ca November menus will be available from 26th October to 30th November at a price of €19 for (a minimum of) three courses. So, don’t miss the ‘tastiest’ month of the Radol’ca year and the chance to treat your taste buds and support local suppliers too! And, in addition to treating yourself, you can now also treat your friends/loved ones by buying them a Taste Radol’ca gift voucher.

© Adele in Slovenia

When Adele in Slovenia Became Adele ‘Is’ a Slovene!

After a process that took almost 10 months and was, at times, exasperating to say the least, I finally became a citizen of the Republic of Slovenia on Tuesday 10th September 2019!

After such a lengthy and laborious process, which began with me passing the Slovenian language exam and was thereafter followed by a period of gathering documents, more documents and more documents, the actual official awarding of the citizenship was a simple and quick affair; just a case of reading the official oath, signing a few documents and that was that!

And since it’s said that every Slovene must make it to the summit of Triglav once in their life, four days later I did just that!

Since it’s not every day that one becomes a Slovene, I decided a good old knees-up was in order and invited those who have been, or rather are, an important part of my life here. After pondering where to hold it, I decided on Gostišče Tulipan in Lesce, as it is known for its great traditional Slovenian food, friendly service, spacious rooms and pleasant ambience.

We had the area downstairs to ourselves and it definitely turned out to be the right choice as the organisation and service was exemplary and I was also delighted that I was able to enjoy a great meal in great company without having to worry about being ‘glutened’ as I had agreed the whole menu in advance and given strict instructions re gluten contamination.

So, I’d like to extend a huge thanks to the whole team at Gostišče Tulipan for their efforts and also thanks to all those who came and made it such a great evening.

And Gostišče Tulipan even took care of a (gluten-free) ‘Slovenka sem’ (I’m a Slovene) cake too, which we managed to polish off pretty quickly!

As befits such a gathering, I donned a Slovenian national costume to (re)read the oath, accompanied by the Slovenian national anthem…

Becoming a Slovene wasn’t easy, as with so many things in life, but I’m proud to be able to say I am and wouldn’t have it any other way!

© Adele in Slovenia

 

 

 

Autumn Hiking at the ‘Top’ of Radol’ca – Mount Begunščica!

At a height of 2,060 metres, Begunščica is the highest point of the Radol’ca area. It rises above the village of Begunje na Gorenjskem and can be reached from several directions; from Radovljica the Draga valley is the most convenient start point. From the parking area at the head of the valley, there is a choice of two trails to reach Veliki vrh (literally ‘big peak’) – the highest point of Begunščica.

The slightly longer but easier of the two routes leads first on the forest road then through the forest road to the Roblekov dom mountain hut and from there onwards to the peak. Nowhere is it overly steep.

The other trail, and the one I will describe below, is my preferred choice – especially since it makes the perfect circular route – but in places is most definitely steep! It leads first along the Shepherds’ Trail to the Preval mountain hut and mountain pasture, and from there onwards and upwards towards the top, followed by the less steep trail down to the Roblekov dom hut and back to the Draga valley – and all without a single retraced step!

I have already previously blogged about the Shepherds’ Trail, so won’t go into too much detail here, other than to say that, should you decide to follow it as per the details in my previous blog, you should only do so up until the point where you reach the Preval mountain hut and pasture; from there on the trail to Begunščica leads off in a different direction.

From the mountain pasture take the path that leads directly upwards across a steep grassy slope before entering the forest.

It can seem like a bit of a slog at times, but once you gain some height and in places emerge from the forest, you can forget the more ‘sloggy’ parts and begin enjoying the views!

Once you emerge from the forest there are a couple of metres of scrambling here and there but nothing too demanding.

Once the ground begins to level out you turn left and start heading towards the highest point of Begunščica, but it’s still around half-an-hour to get there yet, even though the sign says 20 minutes!

Then a short section of the walk leads along a ridge – don’t look down if you have a fear of heights!

The views, however, divert your attention and make it all worthwhile!

Until the end of the grazing season you will be ‘greeted’ near the top by a flock of sheep. And even when they have been transported back down to the valley, you will certainly know they have been there!

At the top there is an orientation table and a visitors’ book and you can rest for a while before beginning the descent.

To make an entirely circular route, descend from Veliki vrh towards the west. It takes around an hour to reach the ever-popular Roblekov dom mountain hut, where you can get some sustenance and enjoy more of the stunning views before returning back to the Draga valley – a further cca. 1.5 hours.

Since October is a great month for hiking and enjoying the fruits of the forest, Tourism Radol’ca has launched a prize game entitled ‘The Wealth of the Forest with Taste Radol’ca‘. To enter all you have to do is head off into the forest and share your experience to be in with the chance to win a Taste Radol’ca meal for 2!

More about hiking in Radol’ca can be found here.

© Adele in Slovenia

Gourmet Fare at Gostilna pri Bajdu and Merriment in Medieval Žiganja vas

Last weekend in Tržič was a busy one, with, among others, a medieval day in the village of Žiganja vas, and Tržič Trail Days – a weekend of guided mountain bike rides. It was a toss up between the two, but I opted to first visit the former – perhaps I have a secret penchant for medieval torture, or perhaps because it meant there was then time to go on to a nearby inn I had heard good things about!

Though only small, the village of Žiganja vas has a number of interesting attractions; the village church, the Three Bells Trail (which I wrote about in a previous blog post here), and the giant village linden tree, which is so huge – and partly hollow – that you can actually go inside it.

The recently renovated St. Ulrich’s church stands in the centre of the village. The first written mention of the church dates back to 1327; its present day appearance dates largely from extensive rebuilding work in 1693, as well as recent renovations to both the exterior and interior.

The medieval day featured plenty for visitors to see and do; guided tours of the renovated church, archery, the chance to dress up in medieval costume, theatrical and musical performances, and more.

It was very well attended and its nice to see such events in small villages; it helps to bring the community closer as well as attracting visitors from further afield. Next year Tržič will be celebrating a special anniversary and many more such events are planned, so, keep your eyes peeled for more!

From Žiganja vas we drove the short distance to the village of Senično and the Gostilna pri Bajdu inn. Since being diagnosed with coeliac disease going to restaurants isn’t the experience it used to be, and in fact can be quite stressful never knowing exactly how a dish has been prepared and if it could have been ‘contaminated’ during preparation. I had been told that they do things “somewhat differently” at Gostilna pri Bajdu, so I decided it was time to boldly go and check it out for myself!

The family-run inn dates back to 1871, as is attested to by the year above the main entrance. It originally served as a stopping point for wagon drivers on long journeys, where their horses could rest for a while and the drivers could get some sustenance. The inn has remained in the hands of the same family since its establishment and throughout the years has become increasingly popular for its excellent home-cooked food, service and hospitality.

It is now being run by the fourth generation of the family, Jani Ribnikar, who, time permitting, is more than happy to take time to talk about the history of the inn and to recommend which of its many dishes to try.

The bar area is reminiscent of an English pub, complete with various humorous pub-like signs too!

And almost every detail in the restaurant has a story behind it, from the pictures and wood carvings to the trophies and other quaint touches.

The huge pork and veal shanks are also a favourite among diners – though do call to order in advance to avoid disappointment!

When Jani said we wouldn’t leave hungry, he wasn’t wrong! We were first treated to pumpkin soup and beef soup.

Followed by two huge platters – one meat-based, the other with vegetables and side dishes made from buckwheat flour, which I can eat, yippee! The  meat-based platter was packed with pork ribs, roast pork and venison – that latter is a popular choice, and at Gostilna pri Bajdu where they serve game with prunes rather than the usual cranberries, thus giving a nod to the tradition of plum-growing in the area.

With so much choice it was hard to know where to start – but we managed…and found room for dessert too!

It’s satisfying to know that not only are you eating a meal made with from scratch and with passion, but also you are eating in a restaurant full of pride and tradition. From the outside Gostilna pri Bajdu is nothing to look at, and it would be easy to pass by the inn without even noticing it, however, now I have discovered it, I shan’t be in any hurry to pass by without stopping, and, if/when you are in the area, recommend that you drop in too! Dober tek!

© Adele in Slovenia

Visit Žirovnica: Autumn Hikes in the Karavanke Mountains

Providing the weather is good, autumn is one of the best times of the year for hiking in Slovenia; the weather is (usually) more stable i.e. there aren’t (usually!) late afternoon thunderstorms like in summer, and the trails are far less crowded than during the peak summer months. On the downside, the days are getting shorter and some of the mountain huts are already closed, with others only open at weekends, but provided you set off in good time and with proper equipment and a well-stocked rucksack, the hiking world – well Slovenia’s little part of it – is your oyster!

The Karavanke mountains above the Žirovnica area are a great destination for hiking year-round.

I have already written numerous blogs about my various hikes in the area, so this blog is a kind of ‘one-stop-shop’ where I have gathered together all, well far from all in truth, my hikes and blogs in the area, as well as a bonus one too!

The hikes listed below are all included in the leaflet ‘Žirovnica Green Energy – Hiking and Mountain Bike Trails in the Municipality of Žirovnica‘.

Valvasorjev dom (Valvasor mountain hut) is the three-times winner of the title ‘Best Mountain Hut in Slovenia’. It can be reached in around an hour from the reservoir in the Završnica valley.

Rezultat iskanja slik za valvasorjev dom

Photo: Planinska Zveza Slovenije

There are numerous onward trails from the hut, including to Stol, the highest peak in the Karavanke mountains.

Ajdna is the name of the tooth-shaped peak beneath Mount Stol and is home to a fascinating archaelogical site. It was settled during the crisis times of the collapse of the Western-Roman Empire in 476 AD. Extensive, expensive and exceptionally complex conservation work was carried out and today there are well-preserved buildings and remains of buildings that are thought to date back to the late Antiquity, though some evidence shows that it may even have been inhabited far earlier.

You can also find out more about Ajdna by visiting the Ajdna Museum Room in Čopova hisa (Čop’s House).

The numerous mountain pastures beneath Mt. Stol are ideal for those seeking easier, more level walks, and/or mountain bike enthusiasts.

The Žirovniška planina mountain pasture and the Zabreška planina mountain pasture are up there among my favourites!

I like to visit the Dom pri izviru Završnice (hut at the source of the Završnica stream) as part of a hike to Srednji vrh.

Starting from the Završnica valley, the trail passes the hut up to the Šija saddle, from where there is no lack of choice where to go next!

Stol is the highest mountain in the Karavanke range. As the Karavanke mountains form a natural border between Slovenian and Austria, you are spoilt for choice with fabulous views in all directions.

The word ‘stol’ means ‘chair’, hence once you are at the top, you are literally taking a seat atop the Karavanke!

The Turkish Cave (Turška jama) is located at an altitude of 835m above the Završnica valley. The name of the cave derives from when, many centuries ago, women and children retreated to the cave to seek refuge from Turkish invaders.

The cave has two entrances, is 18 metres long and 2 metres deep.

I have already written two blogs about Tito’s Village, offering two alternative ways to reach it. The first describes the route from the Završnica valley or, for a more adventurous approach, take the path along the ridge to Mali vrh and onwards to Tito’s village.

The camp provided partisans with shelter from the German occupiers. The camp was in existence from 21 November 1944 – 31 January 1945, which, though only 2 months, was considered long for those times.

And finally, the Hudič babo pere waterfall – the ‘bonus’ walk I mentioned earlier!

One does, however, need a sense of adventure to find this waterfall, not to mention good footwear! I visited in late summer, when water levels were low, but imagine that during autumn the flow of water is somewhat more impressive. You can reach it on foot from the Završnica valley. After around cca. 200 metres from the reservoir, just before a wooden fenced ‘bridge’, take the (unmarked) path to the left. It first crosses a stream over a wooden boardwalk then leads up steeply into the forest where the path almost disappears. Just keep following the water for a further cca.20 mins to reach the top – but please do so with extreme caution!

So, as you can see, there’s no shortage of choice. The hardest thing, as always, is deciding where to go first. Happy Hiking in Žirovnica!

© Adele in Slovenia