A New Addition to the Old Town – The Pharmacy and Alchemy Museum, Radovljica!

Last Friday I attended the opening of a brand new museum in Linhart Square – the Pharmacy and Alchemy Museum – which is a great addition to Radovljica’s already charming old town centre.

I saw the sign being hung for the museum some time ago, and I have to admit thinking to myself at the time that it doesn’t exactly sound that riveting, however, I stand corrected! Having seen it for myself, the Pharmacy and Alchemy museum is actually fascinating. Its location in a beautifully restored bourgeois house in the old town adds to the experience, and I left on a high and looking forward to being able to share the news of this new museum with you – readers of my blog!

Radovljica’s mayor officially opened the museum, then we – the gathered crowd – had the chance to be the first to be ‘let loose’ inside the museum!

The exhibits in the museum have been collected over a 40-year period by its owner, who, together with his daughter, has now gathered the objects in one place and opened this intriguing museum. On entering it is like taking a step back in time, while at the same time the beautifully arranged exhibits have been thoughtfully presented in a timeless and appealing way.

The collection of Spanish and Italian alborel (decorated ceramic pots for storing medicine) is particularly extensive. The exhibits include a collection of mortars, the oldest of which dates from the 12th century, and 30 pharmaceutical books, one of which dates from the 15th century. The museum also features some objects from ancient and Asian medicine and an ethnological collection of folk medicine on Slovenian territory.

The museum shop is a great place to pick up some gifts to take home for friends and/or family, or even to treat yourself!

The shop is equipped like an old pharmacy and sells natural cosmetics, souvenirs with mythological themes, honey, herbs, essential oils, and a range of teas.

The museum and museum shop are open daily from 10am – 6pm. Entrance fees apply.

This bring the tally of museums in Radovljica’s old town to three, or four if we include the Šivec House Gallery, which falls under the banner of Radovljica Municipal Museums – not bad for such a small place, hey! In addition to this newly-opened museum, you can visit the Museum of Apiculture, which is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year, the Municipal Museum, and, as mentioned above, the Šivec House Gallery.

Come rain or shine, there’s always something to see and do in Radol’ca!

© Adele in Slovenia

Slovenia’s Historic Towns and Cities

Statistics show that the large majority of people who visit Slovenia tend to do so for just a few days, either as just a mini-break or as part of a longer trip taking in some of the neighbouring countries. And for those limited in time, the focus is usually on the ‘usual’ tourist hot-spots i.e. Bled Lake, Ljubljana, Postojna Caves, Piran... However, in visiting just these, admittedly marvellous, places, you miss – in my opinion – a large swathe of the country and the chance to see the ‘real’ Slovenia.

Granted, I might be a bit biased since I’m fortunate to live in Radovljica, which has one of Slovenia’s best-preserved medieval old town centres and is a member of the Association of Historical Towns and Cities of Slovenia, but since Slovenia is a perfectly compact country, it is very easy to get around and make detours to other places of interest. So, sure, go to the usual tourist hotspots to tick them off the list, but do take time to see more of Slovenia’s countryside, culture and history too!

Looking over Radovljica and beyond to the Karavanke mountains

For example, if you are visiting Bled, then turn off the motorway (or get off the train or bus) just one stop early, and within minutes you will be in the historic old town centre of Radovljica where you can see, amongst others, the frescoed townhouses, the Baroque St. Peter’s Church, and the Šivec House Gallery.

Vidic House, just one of the frescoed buildings in the old town

The Radovljica Mansion is home to the Museum of Apiculture, the Municipal Museum, and a music school. During daylight hours the building is always open and visitors are welcome to go in and look at the photographic exhibitions in the entrance foyer.

The Radovljica Mansion

Don’t miss a visit to Lectar Inn where you can try traditional Slovenian food and downstairs visit the workshop with it’s 250-year tradition of making red-iced and decorated gingerbread hearts.

The Lectar gingerbread workshop

Radovljica also offers a wealth of great places to stroll, hike, cycle, do water sports, or partake in other active or less active pursuits. Or you can just sit on one of the benches at the viewing area and and soak up the views of the Julian Alps, the Jelovica Plateau and the Sava River.

Looking back at the old town with majestic Mr. Stol in the background

And be sure to come hungry as you won’t want to miss the chance to taste some of the delicious locally-produced food at the 13 restaurants that collaborate in the Taste Radol’ca project.

In addition to Radovljica , there are a further 13 towns and cities included in the Association of Historical Towns and Cities of Slovenia – Idrija, Kamnik, Koper, Kostanjevica na Krki, Kranj, Metlika, Novo Mesto, Piran, Ptuj, Slovenske Konjice, Škofja Loka, Tržič and Žužemberk.

More information about Radovljica can be found here – http://www.radolca.si/en/radovljica-area/ and more about the association here – http://www.zgodovinska-mesta.si/eng/index.php

© Adele in Slovenia