The Apitourism Bee House in Bohinj

The Apitourism Bee House in Bohinjska Bistrica, near Bohinj lake, is a one-stop destination for apitherapy and wellbeing.

The combination of apitherapy, honey massages, and a spacious, well-equipped apartment, makes this an ideal place to reap the benefits of apitourism and enjoy some pampering, and a great base from where to explore the beautiful surroundings of the Bohinj area and Triglav National Park.

The house and apiary is tucked away in a quiet part of Bohinjska Bistrica, next to the Tomaž Godec Museum and alongside a stream, whilst also being within walking distance of local shops and restaurants.

You can relax in a deckchair in the garden, which is planted with honey plants, and watch the bees going about their business.

You can visit the Bee House as a day guest to enjoy apitherapy sessions in the traditional Slovenian apiary and/or honey massages, or stay in the spacious on-site apartment, from where its just a hop and a skip to the apiary, thus making it the ideal place for total rest and relaxation.

After admiring the painted apiary from the outside and watching the diligent bees go about their business, you can go inside, take a seat, place a mask over your mouth and nose and breathe in the goodness.

Apitherapy is known to help improve a number of conditions, particularly respiratory problems, as well as allergies, stress, depression, etc.

To complement the apitherapy sessions, you can also treat yourself to an on-site honey massage, the benefits of which, in addition to being relaxing, include detoxification, boosting of the immune system and revitalisation.

Brane and Mirjam – the owners of the Bee House – are both certified apitherapists and can prescribe personalised wellbeing programmes. They can also offer advice on how various bee products, including honey, honey vinegar, propolis and their own patented drink made from honey and effective microorganisms, can aid a range of conditions.

The modern Bee House apartment has a fully-equipped open-plan kitchen/living/dining room, and 2 bedrooms that can accommodate 4 people.

Image may contain: living room, table and indoor

There are wonderful views of the surrounding mountains from the balcony.

Upon prior arrangement workshops and tastings of honey products can also be arranged.

For information and reservations visit the Bee House Facebook page, call +386 31 490 865, or email: crt.boznik@gmail.com or orbita.bb@siol.net.

So, when in Bohinj, or considering a bee-themed trip, be sure to make a beeline for the Bee House!

© Adele in Slovenia

Taborniški dom na Šiji – Homely Hospitality and Hiking at the Scouts’ Hut on Šija

Unlike the majority of Slovenia’s mountain huts, the Taborniški dom na Šiji mountain hut (translation: the Šija Scouts Hut) is privately run, and the difference is obvious from the moment you arrive.

The hut lies at an altitude of 1,528 metres under the ridge of Slovenia’s longest mountain. There are numerous mountain pastures beneath the Košuta ridge, where cattle graze in summer, and the Šija hut makes a great place to base yourself for a couple of days to hike the pastures or along the ridge. The hut is also ideal for small groups, clubs, school outings, etc.

Owners Simona and Miha pride themselves on the homely atmosphere and home-cooked traditional food. So, I went to check it out for myself and within minutes of arriving, we were chatting like long-lost friends!

And I soon made friends with Jerry the dog too!

The Šija mountain pasture can be reached from several directions; the easiest and most direct of which is from the village of Jelendol, from where you can either set off on foot (cca. 2 hours) or, if you don’t mind getting a dusty car (I do mind, hence I walked!), then you can take the mountain road.

Whether on foot or by car, continue on the mountain road to the sign as seen in the photo below, from where it takes approx. 45 minutes to reach the hut on foot.

The čez frata (translation: through a clearing) path leads up to reach the Ilovica mountain pasture from where its just a 5 minute walk to reach the Taborniški dom.

Note: the path is well marked, however, when you reach the gate at the top of the pasture there isn’t a sign and it’s not immediately obvious whether to turn left or right; turn right and you reach the hut in around 5 minutes.

After a good old chinwag, I was shown to my room for the night. The hut has 4 bedrooms with a total of 34 beds, and a separate 6-bedded room. It has an indoor toilet (always a bonus when staying in the mountains!) and electricity.

I left it to my hosts to choose what to serve for dinner – albeit with strict instructions that it had to be gluten-free. And they didn’t disappoint with jota (a thick cabbage, potato and Carniolan sausage soup) and bržola, a traditional Tržič lamb stew, which these days is getting harder to find, hence Miha and Simona are keen to try to preserve its presence in the Tržič area.

But the best was still to come. The house special dessert – buckwheat omelette with forest fruits – which was seriously scrummy and, even better, is naturally gluten-free too! Well worth the hike! The only problem is I want another one, or two…!

I was fortunate that the weather was glorious, both on the evening that I arrived and the next morning. What a view to wake up to!

And not a bad view for breakfast either!

Speaking of breakfast, you can opt for a more simple continental-style breakfast, or opt to try some traditional specialities such as masunek (a mixture of flour, eggs, salt, butter) and/or buckwheat žganci (buckwheat flour cooked to a porridge-like consistency topped with pork crackling), all served with a mug of kislo mleko (sour milk).

You can visit the Taborniški dom website here (currently in Slovene only, but expect an English version soon), and the Facebook page here.

There are numerous onward hikes from the Šija mountain pasture, either along the mountain pastures or traversing the peaks of Slovenia’s longest mountain. It was sad to bid farewell so soon, but I was equally looking forward to day two of my adventure. Keep reading and following my blog to find out about my ridge hike – more coming soon!

© Adele in Slovenia

Gorenjska Plaža and Firbc’ okn – Fab Fun and Food at the Gorenjska ‘Beach’!

One wouldn’t usually associate Gorenjska – the Alpine region of Slovenia – with a beach, and, of course, it’s true here the landscape is more about mountains and forests than sand and sea. However, Gorenjska also offers a multitude of places to cool down when the heat is on, such as lakes, rivers, waterfalls and pools. Of the latter, the Gorensjka Plaža (translation: The Gorenjska Beach) in Tržič is one of the best, and newest, around!

The pool complex has been fully renovated and is now a modern and attractive facility featuring a great restaurant too.

There are two pools covering a surface area of 1,000 m2 that are filled with natural water which is heated using solar panels; the average water temperature is 26 degrees celsius.

The perfect way to cool off when the heat is on – like now!

In addition to regular opening hours, in summer night swimming is available on Fridays and Saturdays from 7pm to 9pm, while early risers can take advantage of special early morning recreational swimming sessions from Monday to Friday from 7am to 8.30pm.

Daily entrance tickets cost:

  • children up to 2 years of age – free
  • pre-school children – 2 euros
  • primary school children – 3.50 euros
  • secondary school children, students, and pensioners – 4.50 euros
  • adults 5.50 euros

Family tickets are also available at a discounted price.

Having worked up an appetite, I moved on to the Firbc’ okn restaurant which is part of the pool complex. However, this isn’t your usual swimming pool kind of food!

The restaurant has been divided into two areas – one for those on poolside and the other for those more appropriately attired and looking for something more substantial. Firbc’ okn has also become a firm favourite among locals who are not at the ‘beach’ for a swim. So, ‘beach’ or no ‘beach’ you can dine at Firbc’ okn whenever you fancy as its open year-round!

The restaurant is named after’s Tržič’s characteristic firbec oken window – a window for the nosey. You can see the last remaining original such window in Tržič’s old town centre, which you can read more about in a previous blog post here. The bottom of the window protrudes, thus allowing those looking from the window to be able to look directly out and down at those below them.

The varied menu includes house specialities such as wild game and fish, as well as other staples such as salad bowls, pizzas, pasta, grilled meat and more.

 

Owner Željko and his team are happy to recommend what to try, and were more than accommodating when I request a gluten-free meal.

Unfortunately I couldn’t indulge in dessert, but I can look, drool (and slightly weep) if nothing else!

Photo: Foto Čebron

So, when the heat is on, head to the ‘beach’ in Tržič!

Find out what else you can see in the area at the Visit Tržič website.

© Adele in Slovenia